A Doll's House By Henrik Ibsen: A Character Analysis

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In the play A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen, the author demonstrates a woman who has realized what she has been missing herself throughout her whole life. After years of being an understatement, Nora finally decides to speak out and use her voice of not being a child but rather get treated as she is, an adult. When Nora stated, “Both you and I would have to be so changed…” (1568.III) she is giving her husband, Torvald, enlighten about their relationship and how it could get better by both working on their selves. The play does not suggest women leave their husbands to gain their independence and selfhood. Both women and men should find themselves before giving their entire life to a marriage with a significant other. Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's …show more content…
Stephanie Forward states, “… Nora appears to be childish and doll-like, and Torvald addresses her throughout as though she is a small creature: 'my little lark', 'my little squirrel', 'my little spendthrift', 'little featherhead', 'my sweet little skylark', 'Miss Sweet Tooth', 'my little songbird', 'my precious little singing bird', 'my capricious little Capri maiden', 'little featherbrain'”. In this scene, the Ibsen displays how communication or a joke between a married couple can affect the other person mentally and emotionally. She may accept it, but that is no way a woman should be talked upon. Whether Nora shows it or not, the feeling of those pet names from a significant other can really get under one’s …show more content…
“Although Nora may initially seem childish and capricious, we gradually perceive that she cannot be written off as shallow and flighty. After all, when her husband had a problem she attempted to devise a solution. It is also apparent to the audience that Nora loves her children, and [consequently,] she is extremely alarmed by Torvald's assertion that 'an atmosphere of lies infects and poisons the whole life of a home'” (Forward). Nora would do anything for her husband, as shown in the play. For better or for worse, she has resembled upon both of those two words. She went behind his back which is the worse of the marriage, but also, she saved his life with the loan she borrowed and that symbolizes the better of the

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