Women And Gender Stereotypes

932 Words 4 Pages
In magazines aimed at the general population, including Sports Illustrated and Vanity Fair, women are oversexualized with provocative slogans, little to no clothing, and electronically edited photos. This creates an apparent distinction between what the media reinforces as the ideal woman and what women really look like. Here, a phenomenon called the feminine beauty ideal arises. The feminine beauty ideal is "the socially constructed notion that physical attractiveness is one of women 's most important assets, and something all women should strive to achieve and maintain." (Spade 3) In turn, the socialization of younger girls who aspire to look like the unreal values depicted by mass media creates a cycle of unhappiness and depression, one …show more content…
The first model is a real man – one that is athletic, successful, professional, seducer with a beautiful woman by his side. This applies to the Timberland and Breitling commercials, where males look tough and important. However, print publications ignore the fine line between notions of hypomasculinity and hypermasculinity. They display men that are either too masculine or not masculine enough, ignoring how the average males actually looks and acts. Males are scorned by society for “weaknesses” such as emotional fragility and being submissive. They cannot be too stoic, aggressive, or selfish either. In Eric Anderson’s article, “Varieties of Masculinity in Male Cheerleading,” he explains that hegemonic understandings of masculine construction requires cultural and institutional punishment for those who fail to meet the mandates of the dominant form. The form of this punishment varies on the culture and time. Regardless, males have always received negative sanctions for acting in a feminine manner, and even too …show more content…
These roles are constructed by society and through social interactions. Slowly, we can determine which of our behavior receives positive sanctions and we begin to conform to those gender roles. In Spencer Cahill’s “Fashioning Gender Identity,” he explains that adults treat babies differently based on their sex, starting from the earliest days of infancy. This is the beginning of an identity that children begin to develop and eventually goes on to become a sex-class. By associating emotions, attitudes, and even colors with a specific gender, children learn that there are two different types of people. The findings suggest that the mainstream socialization efforts by media advertisements have established a set of qualities that make males and females inherently perceive each other as males or females. For example, being passive, caring, and emotional denotes female tendencies. Conversely, being competitive, unemotional, and independent are the characteristics of a male. (Sociological,

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