Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Analysis

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was a great and famous Austrian musical prodigy of the seventeenth century who wrote a wide range of symphonies, operas, concertos, and sonatas, and has left behind a legacy for people to embrace. Proposed into a life of music, the virtuoso was born on January twenty-seventh, 1756 in the city of Salzburg, Austria. His father, Leopold Mozart, was a violinist that served as an inspiration for Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his musically inclined older sister, Maria Anna (Nannerl) Mozart. The well-known prodigy spent his whole life revolved around music making risks and by spending most of his restless life travelling to pursue his career of music. Publicly performing music since the age of six, Mozart enlightened his confidence …show more content…
Evidence of the beliefs of his work being given too much credit is expressed through critiques of his performances. For example, after the performance of a newly written opera named Così fan tutte, one critic writes “It was given today that a new Opera music composition by Mozart, it is so clever is not at all pleasant, and the subject is pitiful. Actors did not know their role, and the public was not happy” (Chotek). One can infer that this can lead to thoughts that Mozart is given too much credit to his work due to the audience being unhappy towards the finished performance. In antiquity, individuals believed that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was to be an careless composer writing without proofreading his work -- not because he was lazy, but because he was confident that what he wrote was absolutely correct. Maria Sidonia Chotek believes that the first showing of Così fan tutte was "pitoyable" (meaning pitiful), thus demonstrating an animosity towards Mozart’s music. By providing visual insults, it may be assumed that Mozart stived even harder to meet the expectations given by others. Mozart was one to never give up on his work, and the composer always put his own work before his health or mental condition, thus abandoning the idea that he himself was overrated. Even though some believed Mozart was given too much credit for his work, most …show more content…
He even believed himself that he is one “...who will keep on doing things until there is finally nothing left to do…”, and would consume all of his own personal time into doing charity work for others (Mozart). By putting others before himself, Mozart had to force himself to get over the obstacle of stress in order to finish his requests of musical writing. In a written letter to his mother, Mozart explains that "Another matter also has to be resolved between this evening and tomorrow: they want Wolfg. to write the first opera for next Christmas. If this goes ahead, you can be pleased because we shall then certainly be home sooner than would otherwise appear to be the case: as it is, we have enough on our hands trying to get to Rome by Holy Week" (Mozart). The strained writer is explaining to his mother that he has “enough on [his] hands” scrambling to finish another musical piece for a favor to an acquaintance. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart does not have time to write music for his own pleasure despite his better intentions at times. Motivation is a quality needed in people who are successful, and since Mozart does not stop working, even with high constraints, he is therefore exceeding others’

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