Winter Solititude Poem

Superior Essays
For the purpose of this paper, two poems will be compared and analyzed. The first poem is about the emergence of plants from winter into spring called “Spring and All”. This poem is written by William Carlos Williams. The second poem is one speaking of the transition from autumn to winter, written by Archibald Lampman titled “Winter-Solitude”. First lets compare the form of both poems, starting with “Spring and All”. This poem consists of 27 lines organized into seven stanzas. The first stanza is a sestet, the second and fourth are couplets, the third is a quintet and the last three stanzas are quatrains. “Spring and All” has no rhyming scheme as it is a free verse poem. “Winter-Solitude” on the other hand is a one stanza poem consisting of …show more content…
He portrays winter as negative and depressing. This is apparent due to the contrast between words used to describe the plants in winter and in spring. The plants mentioned in the poem concerning winter are “dead” with “brown leaves under [the] / leafless vines” (Williams 12-13). To emphasize the coldness and bareness of the vines, Williams uses the word “leafless” (Williams 13) which causes a chill to run down our spine. The plants are also described as “lifeless” (Williams 14). Which eludes us to the understanding that the plants are dead in winter. Then the poem shifts and is now talking about the emergence of spring. The plants are given life and the mood of the poem shifts towards a more hopeful future. This is perceptible due to the description of life after winter. “They enter the new world naked, / cold, uncertain of all” (Williams 16-17). The new plants are awakening from slumber and are pushing through the dead ones aside. This symbolizes change and a fresh start. Another instance is the very last line of the poem. In this line the speaker tells us “they / grip down and begin to awaken” (Williams 26-27). Again, this means the plants are awakening after the “lifeless” winter. We can see that through Williams’ words, the tone of both winter and spring and how each are portrayed …show more content…
One example of this is in the second line that states “Beyond them a hill of the softest mintiest green”. This line allows us to understand the setting and landscape and also picture it. The fact that the speaker of the poem includes colours helps us to create a more accurate vision of what is happening. Another example of imagery that aids in the understanding of the poem is the transition from autumn into winter. Through vivid colours mentioned concerning fall, the only colour mentioned once the poem transitions into winter is white (Lampman 8). This helps us to understand the feel of winter and also focus on what else is being said as the end of the poem is concentrating on the reflection and solidarity of the

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