Winston Churchill: British Leader Analysis Of Winston Churchill

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Leader Analysis of Winston Churchill Winston Churchill was a British writer, statesman, military officer, and Prime Minister. He was born in1874 at Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire to father Lord Randolph Churchill and mother Jennie Jerome. (Hardy) Churchill “grew up with social status, privilege, and a keen sense of heritage, but little money.”(Churchill museum) He attended the Royal Military College where he graduated 20th in a class of 130 and became an officer in the British Army (Britannica) After military service, Churchill began a career in government where he held positions to include the First Lord of the Admiralty, Minister of Munitions, Secretary of State, and Prime Minister. Throughout Churchill’s life, he was consistently placed in …show more content…
The first practice we will look at is Model the Way. This practice states “leaders need to be clear about their own values and philosophy. They need to find their own voice and express it others.”(Northouse, 2016, p.174) Churchill did this very well. While in parliament, prior to the beginning of WWII, Churchill relentlessly voiced his opinion on what he felt was a very real threat of invasion by Nazi Germany and insisted that action needed to be taken before it was too late. Churchill’s peers and superiors refused to take him seriously. They believed Churchill was spouting conspiracies. No matter how many times Churchill was shut down he refused to be silenced, his warnings needed to be taken seriously (CEO) Churchill was also a man of strong values and principal. In 1924 Churchill left what he perceived as the “moribund” liberal party to join the conservatives. (Axelrod, 2009, p.138) Churchill stated, “Some men change their party for the sake of their principles; others change their principals for the sake of their party.” (Axelrod, 20009, p.41) This showed that Churchill’s would rather be seen as a traitor by both parties then compromise his …show more content…
This practice is described by “rewarding others for their accomplishment.” While serving as the Minister of Munitions during World War I, Churchill implemented a worker bonus plan which “boosted production at the shell plants to the highest level in all Britain.”(Axelrod, 2009, p.105) Churchill also introduced the Munitions of War bill which included “incentive awards to workers with specialized skills.”(Axelrod, 2009, p.105) Churchill’s practice of rewarding accomplishments can also be seen at the end of World War I. While serving as Secretary of State, Churchill was in charge of the War Office, and was responsible for the demobilization of the British Army consisting of over 3.5 million men, while still maintaining an occupation force. (Axelrod, 2009, p.117) Under existing policy “any soldier that who had served at least four months could go home, but only if he could prove that he had an industrial job waiting for him.”(Axelrod, 2009, 120) Churchill revised the demobilization policy taking into consideration soldiers that had served on the war front, would be released first, based on length of service, and regardless of job acquisition on the outside. Additionally, any soldier that had been wounded, or served through the entire four years of the war would be "automatically and instantly demobilized."( Axelrod, 2009,

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