Idealism Dbq Analysis

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The beginning acts of idealism were, seen through the Teller Amendment, which was signed by McKinley. It said that the U.S. was not permitting to annex Cuba, but leave “control of the island to its people.” This meant that the U.S. would help Cuba get their independence, and we would remove all of our troops out of their country. Once again, McKinley feared falling behind the other imperialising European nations, yet, he still chose not to annex Cuba, showing the first signs of self-interest being replaced by idealism. As promised in the Teller Amendment, Cuba gained its independence, becoming the Republic of Cuba, in 1902. Shortly after, the Platt Amendment was passed in 1903 which was heavily influenced by America. Even though the U.S. had …show more content…
In Senator Albert J Beveridge’s Speech in Indianapolis in September 1896, he states, “We cannot fly from our world duties; it is ours to execute the purpose of a fate that has driven us to be greater than our small intentions. We cannot retreat from any soil where Providence has unfurled our banner; it is ours to save the soil for liberty and civilization” (Document B). In other words, he explains the new aspect of idealism in dealing with foreign affairs, mentioning that we spread democracy and capitalism while imperializing, which is beneficial. This idea began to spread due to Theodore Roosevelt who became the President in 1901 after William McKinley was assassinated. Furthermore, it was Woodrow Wilson who finalized America’s foreign policy as …show more content…
He pledged to keep America out of the war because were were not prepared to go against European nations, and his values were made clear with his Fourteen Points. They were principles for world peace, that was meant to be used for peace negotiations after World War I. They mainly advocated for human and democratic rights. Even though he promised to keep America out of the war, he was required to declare war on Germany in 1917. After terrible actions had been played out, such as the Louisiana sinking, the Zimmerman note, and Britain stealing goods from the United States, we were ready to get involved. In 1917, we had teamed with the Allied Powers, and successfully beat Germany in 1918. At the end of the war, Wilson sailed to Paris to negotiate the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. The majority of his Fourteen Points were not adopted in this treaty because France and Britain wanted full punishment and guilt to be placed on Germany. On the other hand, Wilson’s main objective was to maintain world peace. One part that was adopted from the Fourteen Points was the creation of the League of Nations, which was an intergovernmental organisation that tried to influence other nations to embrace idealism in their foreign policy, just as the U.S. had been doing. Even though all of the Fourteen Points were not accepted, they further prove Wilson’s idea of idealism and being anti-imperialistic. At this

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