William Tyndale's Impact On English Reformation

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The English Reformation would not have been the same without William Tyndale, a Protestant who changed the course of the Bible’s English translation. Tyndale’s core beliefs were founded on the idea that the Bible was the highest authority and it was a basic right for everyone to read the Bible in their own language. An idea that came to him as he read the New Testament in Greek as a priest in the Catholic Church. Following his intuition and education from Oxford, he translated the New Testament in English in secret. From the orders of the King, such act was categorized as heresy and punished by death, since it followed Martin Luther’s similar ideas. Once the translation of the new testament was finished in 1525, his copies were smuggled into Europe from his hiding place in the Lutheran City of Worms. Although he never finished the old testament, he became what the BBC referred to as “the …show more content…
His entire life was dedicated to his beliefs even when it all turned for the worst. After being turned in by his friend, Henry Philips, he was imprisoned for 500 days before he was sentenced. Strangled and burned at the stake for his crimes Tyndale paid the ultimate price, but even at that point his impact had been done as thousands of his New Testament copies were in Europe’s streets. Tyndale not only sacrificed his own life but helped the Reformation unravel. As he translated the Bible, into a language and wording most could understand, he gave power to the people to make their decision on the Church of the time. Without him, the reformation would not have held the strength as it did, since the majority of the people were actually oblivious to the scriptures they had blindly followed under the Catholic Church.
Just as William Tyndale became a vital part of the Reformation, John Calvin exceeded such accomplishments as a Protestant theologian. Instead of

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