Wilhelm Wuundt Case Study

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The father of Psychology and founder of experimental psychology Wilhelm Wundt, made his contribution to psychology from as early as 1856 when he strove for achievement as he attended the university of Heidelberg; Tracy B. Henley, etal, (2009/2014). there he wrote his first book and began his teaching career in scientific psychology; specifying in experiential methods which was derived for natural sciences and thinking about the Mind’s structure. Myers, (2010). The definition of psychology as relates to Wundt as quoted is the “study of the structure of conscious experience," Kaufmann,(2013 ). He also claimed that psychologists were in the process of proclaiming the understanding of knowledge cognizant in mandate to recognizing how these …show more content…
Myers, (2010). He theorized that viewers from the outside were not equipped to fully acquire the evidence needed on an individual experience which is conducted through observation. Myers, (2010). One of his main concerns where he directed his concentration was the use of introspection and displayed stern measures in training his students and academics. Wundt expertise encouraged him to open the first Laboratory Institute for Experimental Psychology; this school of psychology was considered and studied of research on intellect and perceptions and philosophy and biology. His modernisms took the study of the human mind into a whole new evolution creating a scientific ground of study. Henley, etal, (2009/2014). Henley, etal, (2009/2014). Wundt's major focus was built around the process of the mind and how it perceived and organized information which reacted to stimuli: This he coined as voluntarism. Henley, etal, (2009/2014). The information he collected was known as a method termed introspection; this he explained is a kind of an individual reflection which he imparted to his students. Henley, etal, (2009/2014). His use of Introspection assisted in the investigation of psychological phenomena. This very difficult task targeted the individual’s reflections and recording of their inner-most thoughts and sensations. Myers, …show more content…
Hockenbury,(1997). However, Wundt’s experimental introspection was known as psychology before a new division of Philosophy in which individuals did an internal introspection of themselves. Hockenbury,(1997). Wundt debated and was quoted as saying, “We learn little about our minds from casual, haphazard self-observation. It is essential that observations be made by trained observers under carefully specified conditions for the purpose of answering a well-defined question”. (Kaufmann,

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