Wilhelm Wundt Psychology

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The father of Psychology and founder of experimental psychology Wilhelm Wundt, made his contribution to psychology from as early as 1856 when he strove for achievement as he attended the university of Heidelberg; Tracy B. Henley, etal, (2009/2014). there he wrote his first book and began his teaching career in scientific psychology; specifying in experiential methods which was derived for natural sciences and thinking about the Mind’s structure. Myers, (2010). The definition of psychology as relates to Wundt as quoted is the “study of the structure of conscious experience," Kaufmann,(2013 ). He also claimed that psychologists were in the process of proclaiming the understanding of knowledge cognizant in mandate to recognizing how these …show more content…
Myers, (2010). He theorized that viewers from the outside were not equipped to fully acquire the evidence needed on an individual experience which is conducted through observation. Myers, (2010). One of his main concerns where he directed his concentration was the use of introspection and displayed stern measures in training his students and academics. Wundt expertise encouraged him to open the first Laboratory Institute for Experimental Psychology; this school of psychology was considered and studied of research on intellect and perceptions and philosophy and biology. His modernisms took the study of the human mind into a whole new evolution creating a scientific ground of study. Henley, etal, (2009/2014). Henley, etal, (2009/2014). Wundt's major focus was built around the process of the mind and how it perceived and organized information which reacted to stimuli: This he coined as voluntarism. Henley, etal, (2009/2014). The information he collected was known as a method termed introspection; this he explained is a kind of an individual reflection which he imparted to his students. Henley, etal, (2009/2014). His use of Introspection assisted in the investigation of psychological phenomena. This very difficult task targeted the individual’s reflections and recording of their inner-most thoughts and sensations. Myers, …show more content…
He defined physiological psychology as fundamental because it made connections between both the mind and the brain. Myers, (2010). Wundt’s modernized method of Psychology is still used in psychophysical work, where responses to methodical performances of distinct external stimuli are measured to a point: reflect action, distinguish or classify colors or sounds. Myers, (2010). As quoted by Wundt, “In psychology mental phenomena which are directly accessible to physical influences can be made the subject matter of experiment. Kaufmann, (2013). Human beings can’t experiment on the mind itself, they depend on the reliability of the organs of sense and movement which are functionally related to mental processes; Hockenbury,(1997). So that every psychological experiment is at the same time physiological”. Kaufmann, (2013). He further theorized that what we experience does not always relate to physical realism. Hence, what we recognize and identify may be misrepresentation of reality therefore termed as an illusion.

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