X Rays History

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In 1895, x-rays were discovered by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. He was a Professor at Wuerzburg University which was in Germany. He worked with a cathode-ray tube in which he observed a fluorescent glow of crystals on a table near the tube. The tube that Roentgen was working with at the time was made of a glass envelope with positive and negative electrodes filled in it. The air that was in the tube was let out. When a high voltage was applied, the tube produced a glow that was fluorescent. He then shielded the tube with a piece of heavy black paper, discovering a green fluorescent light brought about by a material only a few feet away from the tube. Roentgen then concluded that a new type of ray was being released from the tube. The ray was capable …show more content…
Some of the stories were true and some were not. It was interesting that the ray could pass through a solid matter. Also being interesting that it can provide a picture of bones and inner body parts. Scientists were interested by the demonstration of wavelength shorter than light. This would make new possibilities in physics and would also investigate the structure of matter. Many medical radiographs were made in Europe and the United States within a month of this announcement. The surgeons used this during this time. In 1896, X-rays were used by battlefield physicians and they would locate the bullets in wounded soldiers. X-rays were not used before 1912, except for in medicine and dentistry. X-rays weren’t used in industrial application before 1912 was because the X-ray tubes broke down under voltages that were required to produce rays of penetrating power for industrial purposes. Finally, in 1913, the high vacuum X-ray tubes were designed by Coolidge were available. These tubes were an intense and reliable X-ray source. It could operate energies as much as 100,000 volts. Nine years later, there was then an X-ray tube that was 200,000 …show more content…
X-rays can be hazardous. However, no one ever suggested they were to begin with. People who performed X-rays found out that it led to serious injuries. Some experimenters had received skin burns. The first to report eye irritations from the experimentation with X-rays and fluorescent substances were Thomas Edison, William J. Morton, and Nikola Tesla (History of Radiography). Radiation can increase the risk for cancer. While someone is performing an X-ray, the technologists and the radiologists go through many steps to limit their exposure as much as they possibly can and wear protective shields and devices. The kind of risk depends on the patient’s age, gender, and the type of examination. Children are more vulnerable to the effects or radiation and older adults aren’t as vulnerable (Radiology & Radiation

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