Wild Thoughts From Wild Places Analysis

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Some environmentalists write stories of the complexity of the environment without mention of human experience, while other writers take an inward approach to evaluate the change of nature throughout human history. David Quammen’s Wild Thoughts from Wild Places is a compilation of personal accounts that addresses different natural phenomena and looks deeper into the environmental and social justice behind human involvement in the natural world. In Wild Thoughts from Wild Places, Quammen points to specific animal species, white tigers and the superdove, to reveal environmental injustices that are continuously happening in present-day society. His first point elaborates on the process behind obtaining the white tiger, upkeeping the population, …show more content…
For example, one of Quammen’s accounts details the job of the 341st Strategic Missile Wing – the first group to deploy a missile on the planet. This unit consists of members of the Air Force that sit in capsulated offices and wait to hear if they will need to turn the key on a nuclear war. The men of the Strategic Missile Wing are in complete control of unloading nuclear weapons amongst any part of the world, yet they have no idea who or where they are targeting. Unfortunately, the officer inside the small control room imply follow orders, without thinking of the ethical dilemma they could be facing: “American missile crewmen generally don’t know where their own missiles are aimed…” (Quammen 153). The uncertainty introduces a major issue within social justice because the nuclear weapons deployed can easily kill thousands of innocent lives instantly. This catastrophic technology makes the decision-making of those in charge as well as the actions of the Missile Wing extremely important, especially with putting human life in …show more content…
Don Thomas and the art of hunting mountain lions. Although hunting has been frowned upon because of its deliberate killing of nature and the wastefulness it entails, Quammen shines light on a hunter who understands his responsibility to use his prey to its entirety. Dr. Thomas creates his own standards for the ethics of hunting. Thomas will not use a gun, rather he has an expertise with a bow. He hunts lions and bears, not for trophy-only, but to utilize all the meat. Although Dr. Thomas’ mindset is a positive one, many other hunters lack the capacity and knowledge to use up all the resources a kill has to offer. Unfortunately, the carelessness and waste has a direct correlation to the polluted environment and the ever-growing question of the moral decision to hunt innocent animals within their niche. Thomas’ approach to hunting provides a comparison to human preservation and morals. Personal ethics involves drawing lines between decision; Quammen relates this concept to defending oneself but in a peaceful manner, or fighting without the intent to kill. According to Quammen, “We all draw our lines in different places, at different angles, and for different reasons, each line’s position reflecting a mix of individualized factors…” (Quammen

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