Wild Thinking In Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

2551 Words 11 Pages
As characters arose from various situations, a glimpse into the upheld idea of wild thinking became overt. Mr. Wickham, for instance, posed the first series of uncultured acts that applied such conclusions of independent thought. His first such exploit was introduced later in the novel, yet provided a great deal of insight to his character. When Wickham seized the opportunity to, in unguarded moments, act irresponsibly under the Darcy family’s care, Fitzwilliam Darcy took note of this and knew that if he were discovered he could profoundly embarrass his family’s name. The early Mr. Darcy wrote, “The vicious propensities--the want of principle which he was careful to guard the knowledge of his best friend could not escape the observation of …show more content…
She has no money, no connections, nothing that can tempt him to--she is lost forever.” (Austen, 205) As clever Mr. Wickham vindicated their family, one could not doubt his power of thinking and acting freely. Wickham was a strong character who established this uncivilized logic with his requests, theft, and revenge throughout the novel, further proving to be the main antagonist. Pride and Prejudice contained a multitude of characters who acted as they wished without consideration, but like Wickham, Elizabeth Bennet was to be another strong candidate for such unrestricted thought. Introducing her as a strong personality from the start, Austen credited Ms. Bennet with a great deal of individualism in the novel. As silly as it was, Ms. Bingley was jealous of her and Mr. Darcy’s mutual affection and asked Elizabeth to walk around the room with her in order to raise Darcy’s attention. Thinking that she was by no means unable to walk as well as Ms. Bingley, Elizabeth accepted her proposal. Ms. Bingley began, “‘Miss Eliza Bennet, let me persuade you to follow my example, and take a turn about the room.--I assure you it is very refreshing after sitting so long in one attitude.’” Austen then went on to write, “Elizabeth was surprised, but …show more content…
Jane Austen not only used the characters to develop this thinking, but the plot aspect of letter writing as well contributed largely to the topic at hand. Under multiple circumstances during the storyline the author included written messages that conveyed unrestrained thoughts. Understandably, it was much easier to speak freely in a letter when one was not face to face with another. Darcy first exemplified this in his letter to Elizabeth, in which he explained his many circumstances she was unaware of. In speaking of her family and his concern for his friend’s engagements with them, he wrote, “The situation of your mother’s family, though objectionable, was nothing in comparison of that total want of propriety so frequently, so almost uniformly betrayed by herself, by your three younger sisters, and occasionally even by your father.” (Austen, 148) This sentence alone illustrated his freedom of speech and daring spirits that insulted her family in such a way. He not only offended Elizabeth in terms of her mother, but he mentioned her father and her sisters as well on similar terms. Moreover, Lydia’s message to the Forsters, later interpreted by the Bennets, was a highly apparent symbol of such careless acts. As soon as it was discovered, Colonel Forster delivered this note to the Bennets

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