Widikum Menka Village Problem Analysis

Improved Essays
Table 4: Summary of problems analysis for the Widikum-Menka Highlands (2006-2010)

Main problem Causes Possible solutions to the problems Villages contribution to solve the problem External contribution expected from council
Poor
road network Many steep hills, Poor tracing of roads, No gutters, Lack of finances, No culverts, Erosion, Landslides, Lack of regular maintenance, No equipments, Non- fulfillment of promises from political leaders. 1. Sensitization of communities on the importance of participating in road maintenance activities.
2. Develop and implement roles which will mobilize communities to participate in road maintenance activities.
3. Carry out construction of new roads
4. Carry out retracing and grading of existing roads.
…show more content…
The production and distribution of these agricultural produce to the urban markets which are noted to hold enormous blueprints for the rural farmers and improvement in rural livelihood is only possible through rural accessibility. The accessibility situation of the Widikum-Menka Highlands in the North West Region of Cameroon remains a nightmare and cast a lot of doubt on the future of the economic and social development of the sub-region. This is on the premise that the road construction project for this area is perhaps not even contemplated by our socio-economic planners. This is probably why despite the enormous quantity of cash and food crops produced in the country, hunger and poverty still reign supreme in some regions. According to Tetchiada (2004), Cameroon’s food production witnessed a persistent and sustained decline with examples of 1.3% and 1.7% fall in 2002 and 2003 respectively. It is important to note that the fall in agricultural production does not mean less production. The problem lies in the provision of rural roads for the distribution of these farm produce to the urban centers and the country at large. This is probably why Fonjong (2009) noted that the country gradually moved away from one of food abundance to a country experiencing food shortages forcing it to receive her first donation of 2,600 metric tons of food from the UN and FAO in August …show more content…
This is in a bit to harness rural resources for posterity and the need to increase the productivity of farm output. It is also important to note that increase in agricultural productivity without accessibility to the urban markets which hold promise for much higher yields would only plunge the rural farmers into abject poverty and misery. The government’s endeavors in providing rural roads and making life in the rural areas worth living has not been adequately enforced as a preponderant of the rural communities in Cameroon still excel in poverty due to accessibility constraints. According to Adedotun (2013), this has affected the level of production of the farmers as well as their enthusiasm to produce more since most of their produce hardly reach the market or in some circumstances can only reach the market at a high cost as is the case in the Widikum-Menka area. He further stressed that there is need for a comprehensive regional planning in order to enhance the marketing of farm produce. There is also the need for the government to address the issue of rural inaccessibility with all vigour by paying greater attention to the construction and maintenance of rural

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Commercial food products at market are expensive and everything but necessities are out of reach for low income families. The use of commercial farming in addition to subsistence farming seemed a promising prospect for increased economic stability and food security but without access to better technology the ability to sustainably produce food is limited. In the United states poor management of arable land and the increase of population and therefore development is impeding the ability to produce food for the population. Subsistence farming, unlike in south Africa, is not widely known and the lack of knowledge for low income families is decreasing their food…

    • 1184 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They exercised this opportunity to not only provide European settlers with cheap and secure control of land, but to also fool Africans into selling their labor to European farmers, and mine owners. The effects of colonization along with rapid population growth creates a major issue considering the lack of advancement in technology and in farming. Where “Sub-Saharan Africa was estimated at about 684 million” (Ch. 6). Making pressures of maintaining land and water extremely difficult.…

    • 757 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The intense famines in Africa are the result of many interwoven factors, but is the final straw the lack of water? It seems that the areas that can grow crops are over-farmed, and without heat-resistant seeds and irrigation the crops that do survive are not enough. Multiple years of crop failure are the foreshadowing of famine, pulling thousands already living in poverty into the cycle of famine, illness and death. Corrupt governments misuse donated funds to support military and other ventures, keeping the growing population in poverty. Many countries even rely on foreign food donations to support their people.…

    • 595 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The industry quickly grew to meet the needs of the population to the point that its growth remained unhindered. Farmers soon found themselves growing too much food, resulting in an unstable market. “To discourage the resulting surplus, the government instituted the Agricultural Adjustment Act of May 1933, which paid farmers not to produce specific abundant crops or livestock, such as wheat, corn, hogs, and dairy products,” (Kline 2011, p. 75). Here we have a situation where is there is enough food to feed the people, but instead farmers are being told to withhold their production. While this practice helped protect farmers, it did little for consumers who were currently experiencing the Great Depression.…

    • 1083 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    On top of that, due to the limited technology and rural infrastructure, a transition to a more automated agricultural market out be extremely costly. This would lower the cost of food but if the subsidy was removed, the living cost might not change substantially. However this would free up capital to better implement in the future to promote growth, rather than having to cover food costs per annum. With such a massive population, food production is of the utmost importance. But through the Government subsidizing the cost of food production through manual labor, not only does this promote inefficiency, but prevents the diversification of the workforce, leading to less specialization and is unsustainable within the long run.…

    • 1850 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The author unable to prove the situation if food price remains stable, it would have been possible to conclude that famine caused by Food Account availability. But if the demand is inelastic, small decline in food supply at national level can lead to large increase in price. In case of Bangladesh famine, main victims were landless labours who lost their purchasing power. The lack of employment opportunity, alleviation of land by small landholder by flood and sharp increase in price of rice result into failure of exchange entitlement. Sen clarify that food exchange entitlement (FEE) is the proper characteristic of what has occurred than food account availability.…

    • 1112 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Additionally some of the recommended farm inputs are highly priced by the government. Just like any other sectors, should the government,, for example, subsidize the farm inputs by lowering the prices of crucial inputs such as agrochemicals and most importantly quality seeds, small scale farmers will push the economy to the new mark. Sometimes there a gap between research and extension services provide by the field officers and the results on the side of farmers. Most farmers decry a poor state of the returns associated with the use of guidelines put in place by the research firms. They accuse them of a failed outcome of the speculations.…

    • 1421 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    While fossil fuel pollution is becoming an increasing problem, the population of the planet is suffering. GMO farmers are working terrible jobs while not making enough money to live. Similarly, consumers are being affected simply by eating GMO by-products. GMO will never be gone forever, but increasing the amount of GMO crops produced will cause far greater problems than just planting natural, organic plants. Foods may need to travel greater distances to reach their destination while increasing fossil fuel consumption, but it’s a sacrifice we must make in order to keep the population of the planet…

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Since the majority of the population in Niger is rural and heavily dependant on agriculture, climate volatility is a threat to their economic stability and food security. If food supply is low, the price of food will increase. An increase of prices results in less access to food for the poor rural society. In the smaller urban population of Niger, climate change worsens the existing lack of infrastructure. Urban populations in Niger lacks access to clean water and proper plumbing and other commodities.…

    • 703 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The growth of agritourism in Czech is very slow compared to the rate of its neighbouring countries of Poland or Slovenia yet again due to the poor political system. As a country it must diverse to keep up with the demand and to keep up with other countries. In an article by Domeova, L., Jindrova, A. (2011) they state that in the Czech countryside that one in three accommodations for example B&B’s are connected to agriculture some way. Also other way farmers diversify their farms but still keeping the business close to what their farm does would be horse riding, hunting or fishing.…

    • 940 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays