How Was The Battle Of Gettysburg A Turning Point Analysis

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As Edwin Stanton once said, “I am proud to die for my country.” Many soldiers during the battle of Gettysburg through the same thing. The battle of Gettysburg was the largest battle that took place during the Civil War. Lasting for three days in the small town of Gettysburg, Virginia. Some people wonder why this battle had such an impacted on the war and the Union. The battle of Gettysburg was a turning point for the Union because of the Geographic advantages, Robert E. Lee questing his strategies and south wasn’t able the replace the number of casualties.

The first way the battle of Gettysburg was a turning point for the Union was because of the geographic advantages they had. One way the Union had a geographic advantage, was because the battle of Gettysburg was the farthest battle north giving the Union the advantage of arriving first.
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E Lee to question his strategies. One example of this is how he questioned if he was right for the job. According to DBQ doc. C Robert. E Lee wrote to Abraham Lincoln and asked if he could be replaced. This shows that Robert. E Lee thought someone else would do a better as general than what he was doing. Not only did he not think he needs to be replaced, but he also thought he couldn’t risk going back into the north. According to DBQ doc.A shows how after the battle of Gettysburg Robert E.Lee questioned leading his army anywhere but in the south. This shows that Robert. E Lee questioned his choices after leading the Confederates into the north. A third way the battle of Gettysburg made Robert. E Lee question his strategies were because he wasn't meeting the expectations of the people. From DBQ doc.C “I have seen and heard of expression of discontent in the public journals at the result of the expedition.” This shows that Robert.E Lee understands how the southern people don’t like what he is doing and he isn't meeting their

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