Skorton Why Scientists Should Embrace The Liberal Arts Analysis

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Like the title “Why Scientists Should Embrace the Liberal Arts” implies, Skorton believes embracing the liberal arts will enable scientists to communicate to the public more effectively. But before we dives into how Skorton delivers his message persuasively, we need to identify his target audiences first. To start off, by publishing this essay on Scientific American under the category of science, Skorton is targeting at scientists and science enthusiasts since Scientific American is a popular science magazine in the U.S. In addition, the title of this essay itself proposes a question that asks directly to scientists. Further into this article, Skorton points to the problem by referring to controversial science topics such as common vaccines, …show more content…
From the background information, audiences know that Skorton is an expert on topical issues in science and technology whom is invited to write this essay in this SA Forum. Apart from being a prestigious scientist, Skorton is also the president of Cornell University. As an ivy league school, Cornell University no doubt considering as a model of the liberal arts education. Therefore, Skorton is an example of a scientist who embraces the liberal arts. Skorton’s double identity ensures his audiences that he is the right person to discuss the relationship between scientists and the liberal …show more content…
He knows scientists’ hands are tied. There are a lot misinformation campaigns “based on bogus science or political agendas”, and scientists cannot diminish them. Skorton also recognizes that scientists are not rewarded for effective public communication; on the opposite, scientists may not be considered as “serious” scientists if they do so; therefore, scientists are not willing to communicate to the public. Furthermore, Skorton reveals that many scientists never received the proper liberal arts education that enables them to effectively communicate to the public. By showing his understanding toward scientists, Skorton again earns his intended audiences’ trust. While Skorton convey his understanding to scientists, he also appeals to his intended readers for a more effective way of communication to the public. Since those frustrated scientists already trust him, they are more open minded to Skorton’s advice. This way, Skorton effectively persuade them to embrace the liberal arts to achieve this

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