Rhetorical Analysis Of Why I Want To Write By George Orwell

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Why Orwell Writes…. Orwell seems to write openly about his feelings about writing. First he explains what he tries to achieve in the social realm. He feels that he is a political puppeteer in many ways and that he is responsible to write about the time that we live in. Orwell explains that his writing is a product of the times, and that if he had lived in peaceful times it would be likely that his fiction would be very different than it is ow. However, he writes about what is necessary to write about: anti-totalitarianism and pro-democracy. What is interesting to this reader was Orwell’s confessions at the end of the essay, stating that all writers are rather possessed by a strange demon because writing is really not very enjoyable. …show more content…
He remembers his childhood as being isolated, but full of deep, distracting thoughts. He remembers that he had a unique ability to say things that others could not: “I knew that I had a facility with words and a power of facing unpleasant facts, and I felt that this created a sort of private world in which I could get my own back for my failure in everyday life.” (Orwell). Orwell’s isolation was comforting to him because he knew he had a calling. I have known kids like this, and thought that they seem happy being isolated. They are usually pretty smart, and they are usually called nerds. Orwell was a nerd who wrote really cool books about timeless themes, even if the themes were a product of his time. I am moved by reading Orwell’s essay because I can identify with his feelings about society. I also identify with his feelings as a child. IT seems that as a child, we get and form our ideas about society. I know that as a child, for me, there were times that I realized that there were things that were not right, yet everyone seemed to blindly participate. Orwell must have made the same observations and he must have thought that society was not taking the appropriate precautions to protect itself against the totalitarianism. Orwell actually witnessed the most totalitarian dictators that have possibly existed in history. No wonder he wrote about …show more content…
Orwell’s persona comes through, but the simplicity of the poem is deceptive. These poems might have been Orwell’s concentration if he had lived during a time of peace, one that did not have scary people like Stalin and Hitler running things. Given Orwell’s attraction to writing anything that is descriptive, it really is probable that he would have been a famous poet rather that a novelist. However, I do not think that a happy person could have written the types of stories that Orwell wrote. I also do not believe that Orwell could ever escape being a product of his time, even in his own private ours. That is probably why he depicts Big Brother as being always there and always around; he feels like that has already happened to him. One of the key ingredients to happiness in peace, and therefore, it is unlikely that Orwell was happy, per se. In fact, the way that he describes the book writing experience itself sounds pretty awful and miserable. Why would Orwell want to write unless he was possessed by the writing demon that he describes: “Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.” (Orwell). I am happy that Orwell had these demons, and that his art came through

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