The Symbol Of Innocence In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1470 Words 6 Pages
In the novel, the mockingbird is a symbol of innocence and killing a mockingbird would to be to unnecessarily persecute someone or something. During Chapter 10, Atticus explained to Jem and Scout why not to shoot at mockingbirds. Mockingbirds represent the idea of innocence as they don't do any harm to their surroundings, so to kill one would not only serve no purpose, but it would be morally wrong. There is no justification for killing a mockingbird, and yet hunters and children still shoot at them. Similar to shooting a mockingbird, there are innocent people in Maycomb that are persecuted for no real reason. Some people including Tom Robinson and Boo Radley, were persecuted in more major ways, while people like Jem and Scout were only slightly …show more content…
Avery's accusations were somewhat ludicrous, the children believed him and were forced to carry the undeserved guilt. Blaming them for something that they did not do, Mr. Avery took a "shot" at the innocent children. Tom and Boo were persecuted in more significant ways that altered their entire life. Innocent and guilty of nothing, Tom was still somehow convicted by a jury and sent to prison where he eventually was literally shot and killed. On the other hand, Boo was not killed in the novel, and yet he was persecuted by the town, so much so, that he was in essence, banished into his own home. Scout tells readers at the beginning of the novel. There was no evidence showing that Boo deserved to be locked up in his house, nonetheless, that was how life was for Boo. Through the symbol of a mockingbird, Harper Lee was able to demonstrate her theme of innocence and how people, for one reason or another, just can't help themselves when they take "shots" at innocent …show more content…
Dill had unexpectedly shown up at the Finches house one night, claimed that he was "running away from home". Scout was going to bed one night when she discovered a foreign entity under her bed. Realizing that it was only Dill, Scout proceeded to smuggle some food from the kitchen to give to him. Jem, having a bit more sense, is worried that Dill's parents were troubled by Dill's absence. When neither Scout nor Dill made any move to go inform any adult, Jem took it upon himself to be the voice of reason. Jem, showing his maturity with his actions, calls for Atticus to come. Both Dill and Scout are horrified, distraught over the notion that Atticus will send Dill back home. On the other hand, Jem was mature enough to see that letting an adult know that Dill was safe, was more important than protecting Dill's secret. Not quite at the same level of maturity, Dill and Scout were unable to understand Jem's reasoning. Jem goes on to explain why he was obligated to spill the beans. Mature enough to be able to put himself in Dill's mother's shoes, Jem knows that any parent would be extremely worried if their child went missing, so it would not be fair to harbor Dill in their house without telling someone. Atticus, to the surprise of Scout and Dill, does not make Dill return home, but allows Dill to stay, the only stipulation was that they must

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