Why Liberals Are Wrong About The Constitution

Improved Essays
“The Liberals and Conservatives have expressed that they support the Constitution, and the values symbolized in it, but they frequently fight about the government’s power when it comes to criminal justice, moral regulatory, the economic regulatory powers and its war powers (Lentz, T.,2013).” Liberals are very easily angered when someone accuses them or suggests that they do not understand or support the Constitution. Unfortunately, Liberals have stopped believing in the principles of the Constitution but the reasons why are not clear. We must now try to figure out why Liberals are wrong about the Constitution. There are several reasons why Liberals are wrong about the Constitution. Liberal says that they do not like the Constitution because they feel that it is a puzzling and rigid document that only a person of higher learning (i.e. professor, scholars, Ivy Leaguers, etc.) can understand it Liberals believe that the Constitution should be explained according to the current social changes and expectation. “The Constitution had become so irrelevant to liberals that when former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was asked, regarding Obamacare, where in the document Congress is granted the power to force people to buy health insurance, she asked incredulously, “Are you serious? Are you serious (Troia, …show more content…
Liberals are wrong when they say that the Constitution is a rigid document that does not evolve with time because there have been 27 amendments to the Constitution since it was ratified in 1789. Liberals fail to see that these amendments were ratified because of the nation’s changing needs are different than when it was created in the eighteenth century by our

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