Why Is The Bombing Of Hiroshima And Nagasaki Essay

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1945 was the end of the biggest war in US history, and there is one major event that is one of the most argued topics about history to date. America was the first country ever to use the atomic bomb in warfare and it was very catastrophic, but the age-old question is still debated today: was it necessary to use the atomic bomb in warfare at all, let alone twice? The bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was very destructive to the people and the land, killing over 100,000 people on impact and later tens of thousands more from: sickness, disease, radiation, etc. and destroying the majority of the land creating a fallout. This controversy is very important to society because people argue that if the bombs were not dropped thousands of innocent lives …show more content…
One of the sides is that the bombing of the two cities was justified because without it, Japan might not have ever surrendered in the war. Boas explains this here by saying, "The extremists thought we should fight to the bitter end until every man had been killed....In a way it could be said that the atomic bombings and Russia 's sudden attack on Japan helped to bring about the end of the war. If those events had not happened, Japan at that stage probably could not have stopped fighting” (1). This quote supports this side because it summarizes that if we hadn’t dropped the bombs then there was still a chance that Japan would have kept on …show more content…
If the bombing had never happened there was a great chance that the Japanese would have never backed out of the war and it would have gone on longer and many more American soldier lives would have been lost. When the bombs were dropped it prevented the possibility of more attacks coming from Japan onto American and killing American civilians. When the bombs were dropped America’s morale was at an all-time high, and everyone was feeling fantastic because of the incredible feat even more than when the test had been a success back, “In mid-July, after the successful test of the bomb in New Mexico, scientists at Los Alamos had snake-danced with joy. They had pulled off a stunning exercise in physics, brilliantly solving a technical challenge of incredible complexity” (Parshall 1). Everyone was extremely happy because of what the American scientists had pulled off, and no one thought twice about it, everyone was just so happy. “The White House announcement called the atomic bomb ‘the greatest achievement of organized science in history.’ But when Groves telephoned J. Robert Oppenheimer in Los Alamos to report the success of the Enola Gay 's mission, the most Oppenheimer could say was that "everybody is feeling reasonably good about it”

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