John B. Watson

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Even though some people think, psychology is not a type of science, it is because many scientists have studied the behavior and mental process of humans. Julie, among many others, do not think psychology is a science. Unlike Julie, Edward Titchener thinks psychology is a science and should be studied. There are many schools of science, the school where Titchener worked closely is the school of structuralism. John B. Watson belongs to the school of behaviorism. Titchner and Watson have studied humans in psychology.
Psychology is the scientific study of human behavior and mental process. “Psychology is a science that seeks to answer such questions” (Meyers 2). Many people learn about psychology through everyday things, such as, interactions with others. “For people whose exposure to psychology comes from popular
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Watson he was a psychologist who believed in behaviorism. Behaviorism is the school of psychology that studies only observable and measurable behavior. He had no doubt that a phenomenon could be observed by the behavior of people. John B. Watson rejected introspection. He “dismissed introspection and redefined psychology as ‘the scientific study of observable behavior,’ you cannot observe a sensation, a feeling, or a thought, but you can observe and record people’s behavior as they respond to different situations,” (Meyer 4). People agreed with him. “Many agreed and the behaviorists became one of psychology’s two major forces well into the 1960s,” (Meyers 4). Behaviorism is also the view that psychology should be an objective science that studies behavior without reference to mental process. “The key word in psychology’s definition is science,” (Meyers 5). John B. Watson could have showed Julie his research from his experiments with his conditioned responses. “Working with Rosalie Rayner, Watson championed psychology as the science of behavior and demonstrated conditioned response on a baby who became famous as ‘Little Albert’,” (Meyers

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