Why Do People Want To Climb Everest

1661 Words 7 Pages
In 2004 through 2014, about 4,053 sherpas have died. This number would decrease if the government would ban expeditions, if people are not experienced. Throughout the years Everest has been a challenge that most climbers want to attempt. However, most people have different reasons on why they want to climb the mountain. One of those reasons that today stands out the most is that they want to feel more better than anyone else. With that big ego that they have, they ignore the fact that they are inexperienced, and could cause danger to others. The main people that get injured would be their guides, which most of the time would be Sherpas. Sherpas put themselves in danger each day to earn money to feed themselves or their family. In most cases, …show more content…
So, wouldn’t climbing Everest also require someone to consider the safety procedures? Especially for the people who are inexperienced in climbing. They need to either consider what could really go wrong and who else it could put in danger. According to, “ ill-fated American guide Scott Fischer told writer Jon Krakauer, “We’ve built a yellow brick road to the summit.” He was referring to the miles of ropes that are now annually set along most of the South Col route between Base Camp and 29,035 feet. More accurately, however, it’s Sherpas who do the construction and, all too often, become its casualties” (The Disposable Man). Since most inexperienced climbers don’t listen to the warnings given to them, Sherpas have to secure the safety for them. The quote is an example of my reasoning, because they have to put a rope that is suppose to help the climbers. While doing this tasks they are in danger of accidents happening during the construction. Most people who would debate this problem would say that it’s the Sherpas choice to put themselves in danger. All though it is their choice, most Sherpas don’t really have a choice to do much else. Into Thin Air stated that, “The Sherpas actually had a rough time getting their economy up since they are mountain people. Farming couldn’t be an option, and trading Yak wasn’t enough for them either. Then came along the british who helped them by …show more content…
Overcrowding people could cause more accidents than when they are alone. National Geographic actually proves this by showing how dangerous it is when too many people climb the mountain, and over crowded. National Geographic also stated with a picture explaining, “Traffic chokes the Hillary Step on May 19, 2012. Some climbers spent as long as two hours at this 40-foot rock wall below the summit, losing body heat. Even so, 234 people reached the top on this day. Four climbers died.” (Maxed Out on Everest). Opposers would say that even if there is some obstacles to go through some obstacles, they would still make it. In this case, like others, they have something that could lead to illnesses and make them weak. If they are weak then they can’t bare through the rest of the climb. This article also had a photo during night at the mountain and expeditions going on. They push themselves too much that “ Without tighter safety rules, climbers will continue to face more hazards on the mountain than altitude and the elements. “The most dangerous thing about Everest,” said one guide, “is everyone else who’s trying to climb it” (Maxed Out on Everest). Even if they do climb all by themselves they could get through it because that’s what they trained for. Despite that, the government should limit the number of people that climb up to not have any more

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