Why Do Language Die? By Noah Tesch

964 Words 4 Pages
The article “Why Do Language Die?” by Noah Tesch reminds me a conversation that I had with a Cherokee when I visited a Cherokee preservation festival several years ago. The young man I have talked with had told me that they are demanded from the government to adapt the endangered Cherokee culture into their everyday lives, which include their younger generations to learn Cherokee languages along with English. Languages are not only a way to communicate, they also represent different cultural identity and the extent of human diversity. Some people consider language loss alike to specie loss in a way of idea mislay and therefore should be kept spoken and constantly changed over time. The conservation of languages is necessary, however, without …show more content…
Corresponding to the fact that the environment is a factor to the language preservation by using the old method, these new implements may help to compensate this flaw. Additionally, since this is accessible to every part of the world at any time periods, it allows more efficiency in learning the language by give access to those who value and have desires to learn it. “So speaking that language is key to accessing jobs, education and opportunities,” as Rachel Nuwer mentions in “Languages: Why We Must Save Dying Tongues,” languages are an important factor for parents considering the future of their children. Especially for those used in less developed countries, some parents perceive their heritage language as “a potential hindrance to their (children’s) success in life” therefore they do not want their children to learn it (Nuwer, “Languages: Why We Must Save Dying Tongues”). Enthusiasm allows better learning. For this reason, if languages are publicly opened to people around the world, public can learn the languages with more efficiently while children can focus to …show more content…
That is true, however, languages are representation of various cultures and therefore learning it is necessary to comprehend a culture. English had proved as an example. Betty Birner, a member of the Linguistic Society of America made a comment about famous works that are written in old English, “Chaucer 's Canterbury Tales are very tough sledding, and if you went back another 500 years to try to read Beowulf, it would be like reading a different language (Birner, “Is English Changing?”).” This proves not only “2000 languages” around the world are dying, the most common language spoken today is too, had changed (Tesch, “Why Do Language Die?”). The old English can be perceived as a dead language since there are no one speaking like Chaucer in any part of the world; however, its cultures remained through relics like Canterbury Tales trigger people to learn the language as we do in English classes and everyday lives. There are some defunct languages that cannot revive due to the fact that “writing is a relatively recent development in our history” and therefore too few written records are now remaining for that language (Nuwer, “Languages: Why We Must Save Dying Tongues”). However, if we have those languages kept down in an artifact form, then there will always be people willing to study and revive

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