Why Are Toys So Gendered, And Why Are Toys So Gendered?

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The bell rings and class begins. “Boys please leave the room so I can speak privately to the girls,” I hear before my teacher begins math class. The boys file out of the room one by one as I wait quietly at my desk. Once the last boy leaves the room, my teacher shuts the door behind her and turns to face the class, “Ladies, please kneel in the aisle next to your desk.” I look around and watch as the other girls begin to get out of their chairs to kneel beside their desks. I, too, get up to kneel next to my desk. I feel the cold, hard ground pressing against my knees. I wonder why I am kneeling on the floor of my math class. I wonder if the other girls know why we are kneeling. I can see the boys in my class looking in the window and laughing …show more content…
Parents announce the sex of their new baby and begin to receive pink or blue gifts. Each color representing something more than a pigment. It’s not hard to spot the segregation of men and women. Even five-year-old Riley in “Why Are Toys So Gendered?” by Cordelia Fine poses the question, “Why does all the girls have to buy pink stuff and all the boys have to buy different colored stuff?” This question shows how boys and girls are molded from a young age into a category and made to fit into it. It places them into stereotypes that will stick with them into adulthood. Fine explains, “Toys for boys facilitate competition, control, agency, and dominance; those for girls promote cooperation and nurturance.” Now look at careers which are deemed for men or for women. Girls are taught to play with dolls because they will one day have to take care of their own baby. Boys play with toys that help them to develop skills and interests. Children are placed in a box before they have the chance to discover who they truly …show more content…
We can see this in the statistics: women make seventy-nine cents to every dollar that a man makes for equal work. We can see this in the media: women are sexualized and treated with a double standard. This all starts with young girls. What girls see in the media and from women they look up to effects how they will act and feel as adults in society. The way young girls are treated will also affect how they will view themselves. The way I was treated that day in seventh grade was something that effected me and made me begin to think differently about how women are treated in society. Women are told to dress and act a certain way that is accepted. In “Girl”, Jamaica Kincaid states, “this is how to behave in the presence of men who don’t know you very well, and this way they won’t recognize immediately the slut I have warned you against becoming.” Kincaid calls attention to the fact that women are instructed with guidelines for the proper way to behave. Instead of teaching young men to treat women with respect, it is the responsibility of young women to protect themselves against being sexualized. No boys were asked to cover up in order to not draw attention to themselves. That day the length of my skirt was a way for me to be sexualized. If it wasn’t long I enough, I was going to be demonized by

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