Who Were The Loyalists Essay

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2. Who were the Loyalists? What kind of people were they? What were their reasons behind their opinions? Who were the Patriots? What kind of people were they? What were the reasons behind their opinions? Describe the events leading up to the battles of Lexington and Concord.

The Loyalists were “colonists who remained loyal to Great Britain during the War of Independence” (Foner A-66). Most of the men that were Loyalists were wealthy, and their livelihoods did depend on their work relationships that they had with Britain. While others were slaves who were hoping that if they sided with Britain, Britain would defeat America and they would gain freedom. The Loyalists seemed to be people from all over, all different, that stood together
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There was no president to enforce the laws and no judiciary to interpret them. Major decisions required the approval of nine states rather than a simple majority” (Foner 240). These problems are what ultimately led to the demise of The Articles of Confederation. To help “generate support, Hamilton, Madison, and Jay composed a series of 85 essays that appeared in newspapers... and were gathered as a book, The Federalist, in 1788” (Foner 254). They were trying to get people t understand that the Constitution was helping and protecting them. While on the other hand, there were anti-federalists, and they believed the complete opposite. They “insisted that the Constitution shifted the balance between liberty and power too far in the direction of the latter” (Foner 256). The Anti-federalists were for the Bill of Rights, and felt that it would add important things such as freedom of press and speech. The wanted the Bill of Rights to be implemented so that they could be protected against the Constitution, and that it would also guarantee peoples rights. The Federalists hated the idea of adding the Bill of Rights, and feared the anti-federalists would ultimately win, and get their

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