Who Is Vermeer's View Of Delft?

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Johannes Vermeer, the creator of View of Delft, born October 31st, 1632, in Delft, Netherlands. As one of the most highly regarded Butch artists of all time, Vermeer’s View of Delft, created in 1661, is a well known paintings of the Dutch Golden Age. Depicting Vermeer's hometown, this oil painting shows the sky, city, and water divided. There are a few other Vermeer paintings of Delft, including The Little Street, which tells his viewers that where he is from is valuable to him. Techniques like this allowed Vermeer to use realism to share his life, events and beliefs during his life with his viewers. Vermeer’s hometown painting, View of Delft, depicts through light, color, and contrast, a beautiful, hopeful outlook on life. When first seeing View of Delft it is safe to say that the first element noticed is the city. The Oude Kerk on the left, one of the tallest buildings in Delft, darkened and shadowed beyond the city lines. Oddly enough, this very building is where Vermeer is now buried. In the middle, the Schiedam Gate. The large …show more content…
The city of Delft, the sky, the clouds, a body of water, and people across the water looking in at the city. In an article entitled Johannes Vermeer and the Art of Solitude, author Sudip Bose’s opinion is that viewing the content of artwork should not be rushed. Bose compares two visits he made to The National Gallery of Art in Washington, his first, having to view many of Vermeer’s works in a rushed, crowded environment, and his second, 20 years later, having the time to truly view and interpret the paintings. In his article, Bose (2016) says, "Few artists seem more unsuited to a hurried and harried viewing experience." (Bose para. 7), this is an agreeable point by saying an artist such as Vermeer should be pondered and analyzed. It is enjoyable to be able to work at one’s own pace with no distractions or time limits, an argument Bose has had personal experience

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