White-Collar Fraud Case Study

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White-Collar crimes are usually non-violent crimes which occur in corporate structured organizations. In the words of Edwin Sutherland, a crime committed by a person in a high status position and respectability in the course of their profession or occupation (Brody and Kent 2010). Financial fraud, embezzlement, insider trading, identity theft, and forgery are a few examples of crimes of a corporate nature. A white-collar crime described as “the largest Ponzi-type scheme in Canadian history” (Ewart 2015) by Gary Sorenson, 71, and Milowe Brost, 61 took place in Calgary Alberta 2015. The pair had allegedly deceived and conned large corporations, by way of taking funds from new investors for various investments in their fictional gold enterprise, …show more content…
Sorenson and Brost had been committing this financial fraud for years of time, without any worry of getting caught or any doubts in their abilities. The pair essentially did not believe that they could get caught as there laws/regulation around these crimes. Studying these executive oriented crimes is a way to spread awareness of the ways people can deceive another, and to prevent as much as possible. It is important to take white-collar crimes as seriously as violent crimes. Despite the fact that they do not necessarily physically hurt one, they cause emotional trauma and financial difficulty. This paper will discuss Edwin Sutherlands criminology definition in principle to white-collar crimes to explore and evaluate the causes and implication of corporate organized …show more content…
This is not analogous because, given that both groups in the comparison share the locational attribute, that attribute cannot account for the difference in their behavior (Hirschi and Gottfredson 1987). This causes the shift from the social location attributes to the individual strain and pathology of opportunity. Which then in theory would be an analysis of the common features between corporate crimes to the individual tendencies of criminality and the manifestation of opportunities. As opportunity structures with low external control (1987), meaning the sanctions and the risk of crime being detected influence an individual to do a cost-benefit analysis. That is when a person has essentially no choice as to whether they should commit a crime or not, as either way they will face difficulties or negative

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