Whistleblowing In Healthcare

1231 Words 5 Pages
Introduction “Whistleblowing” refers to a person who informs a person of authority or the public of the wrongdoings, corruption, and/or illegal acts of a company. The objective of the whistleblower is to cease the wrongdoing and to stop further corruptions within the company (Ray, 2006). These corruptions can occur in any type of workplace, including law offices, hospitals, research labs, and manufacturing plants, just to name a few. Since the 1960s, the importance of whistleblowing has become increasingly recognized, due to the fact that there are now laws and statutes that protect whistleblowers (Callahan & Morehead, 1992). This allows for more corruption within companies to be brought to light, which can protect the public from impending …show more content…
Considering that whistleblowing in a hospital can pose an even greater dilemma than other workplaces, precisely because of the third parties involved: the patients (Mansbach & Bachner, 2010). The particular example I will discuss is as follows: If a nurse observes that a doctor is practicing unethical medicine or performing unnecessary procedures on a patient and doesn’t say anything (doesn’t blow the whistle) then the patient could possibly be harmed (Mansbach & Bachner, 2010). Although, if the nurse does blow the whistle and the doctor or hospital’s reputation is tarnished, it could affect the work environment and the quality of care given to the many other patients of that hospital (Mansbach & Bachner, …show more content…
I agree that in a hospital or any other healthcare environment there is an essential degree of trust and loyalty that should occur between the healthcare providers (doctors, nurses, technicians, administration etc.); being that the demands of working in a hospital are often great, and the coworkers must be able to work together to function effectively and efficiently for the patients (Twibell & Townsend, 2011). When coworkers trust and support each other, not only is it a healthier work environment but it results in decreased errors and better communication, which promotes better experiences for the patient (Twibell & Townsend, 2011). However, the purpose of a hospital is to care for patients and “do no harm,” once someone goes against their oath of a healthcare provider and starts to hurt patients, I find the loyalty among the coworkers is no longer a topic of pertinence. Another reason some may find whistleblowing disloyal is because it could tarnish the reputation of the hospital. Again, a hospital is meant to ethically treat patients and not harm them. Therefore, when corruption is exposed it could force the hospital to review its ethics and employees, to make sure that patients do not get

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