What's The Matter With College Analysis

758 Words 4 Pages
Overtime, college has adjusted to an infinite number of changes. To the point where every year something is different than the last. Many wonder if college is worth the time and money at this point. Accordingly from two different generations, Rick Perlstein wrote “What’s the Matter with College?” and Liz Addison composed the essay, “Two Years are Better Than Four” to debate the college experience, who the college market is directed to, and the overall value of college to American society, which depicts how much college has changed in effectiveness throughout the years. While the college experience is different for everyone, both writers have distinct ideas as to what a student’s experience entails during their time at college. Perlstein …show more content…
Perlstein elaborates that college is depicted as a place for 18 years olds where they can discover themselves as well as in a “mystic” environment, but he knows this is a false image that colleges use to entice people to apply. So when Perlstein posed the question to a student he knew, they replied “They’re assuming the market is for students, it’s not. It’s for parents” (Perlstein). In the same way, many students only attend college as a result of their parents, because those parents decide their children’s future career. Nevertheless Addison replies, “This college brochure is not marketing for the parents-because the parents, nor grandparents, probably never went to college themselves” (Addison 212). More recently, students are able to decide for themselves, choosing what they are passionate about, and what college they want to attend to determine their career path. In brief, this debate reveals a shift in the independence of students, showing that many are in college now of their own accord, rather than because their parents force them to …show more content…
While Perlstein does address that some students enjoy college and understand the benefits, he still questions its importance and value to students. As Perlstein talked with students on campus, he noticed they “described college as a small town they’re eager to escape” (Perlstein). The quality of the college is an effective factor to consider. Another student Perlstein conversed with, named Hamilton, told Perlstein he was frustrated with school work, so he talked to the counselor. That counselor told Hamilton that he was not meant for college, and should drop out. If this was a quality school, they would not give up on their students, instead give advice as to what other options a student may have to choose from. In contrast, Addison believes college, especially community college, upholds importance. She states, “They offer a network of affordable future, of accessible hope, and an option to dream” (Addison, 214). There are multiple advantages to college that Addison believes make the time and money spent in college worth

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