Essay On Thomas Paine

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Thomas Paine, an English born man became one of the most influential figures in the United States’ fight for independence. A failed rope maker, tax collector, and tobacco shop owner, Thomas Paine emigrated from Great Britain to the American colonies and became critical in the fight for the nations independence. The pamphlet “Common Sense” written by Paine, shortly after his arrival, would serve to become one of the most crucial writings in American literature. Paine, a man of many talents, found his calling in inspiring the nation to join the revolution.
Being born to religious parents, his father a Quaker and mother belonging to the Church of England, Paine received a religious upbringing. By the age of thirteen Paine was finished with primary
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The decision to form a new government rather than have improved representation with England eventually spurred his decision to write Common Sense. Thomas Paine clearly saw that the colonies were treated as inferiors under the rule of England. Being an Englishman himself and denouncing the monarchy, he became one of England’s most fierce traitors. Thomas Paine was an atheist, which in the late 18th century was pretty taboo; however, this non-religious stance is what drove Paine and his dedication to a new government. Paine believed that it was impossible to have the rights of man asserted without the denial of an interventionist God. He believed that if the promises of religion are true, in any respect, then there would be no need for social reform or democracy, because the promise can be fulfilled some other way, such as prayer, good works, or, perhaps, just faith, none of which actually seemed to work in Paine’s opinion. Paine, therefore, can be thefounding father not just of the American Revolution, but also of what we call the enlightenment movement. He claimed that because we are alone, we must turn to one another for answers. He did not see God helping citizens with their problems. Democracy and democrat were to be key words amongst the rebels, sadly these terms had a negative connotation attached to them,

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