What Role Did Women Play In The Progressive Movement Essay

Improved Essays
Kelton Clark
History 2300
Exam #1
Question:Define Progressivism. What role did women play in the Progressive movement? What were the Progressives’ goals?

Progressivism is a very interesting topic within history that had a big impact overall. It overall really supported social reform. It came about during the Age of Enlightenment Era, in which this social reform became prominent. In simpler terms Progressivism can be defined as the support that was given behind the social reform. This was very important in shaping America as well. Through women having their own specific role and breaking down their goals piece by piece we will be able to unfold the intentions of progressivism. Progressivism ultimately changed the U.S. permanently, by playing
…show more content…
The main role of women during this time was to be housewives and mothers. Poorer mothers had to do small amounts of work such as sweatshops but for the most part they just were housewives. But they were huge in reformers, meaning they had big impact on types of reform. Many women pushed for the prohibition of alcohol. Many women believed the labor laws of children should be improved so labor unions were formed. Women also push for better paying jobs, because the wages they were getting paid were very low. And one major thing women impacted during this movement was women’s suffrage. Many women wanted the right to vote during this time. They mainly focused on all aspects that would appeal to mothers and wives. Things they all aspired to do or want to change. By doing this, gave women a very prominent role in progressivism movement today. Many by which are still in to play to this day. They paved a way for future women and future America. They increased opportunities for themselves which was great. Gave some women the ability to actually carry out a profession! Although activists did not agree with the same values, women were a major key in this movement. All in all above I mentioned what this movement was about, the goals, and women’s role in it. This movement will remain a huge staple in history by helping us today have all these things they worked hard for, in everyone’s everyday life

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The Women's Movement

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages

    She hoped that women would acknowledge this and break away from societies expectations of the ‘perfect’ women. Friedan’s book became exceptionally popular, especially women within the middle class. More women began to question their role in society and their contentment with their life styles. As this new perception of a liberalized woman began to spread, more women became involved with the Women’s Movement. Betty Friedan also played a vital role in founding the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966, which is one of the biggest feminist organizations.…

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Florence Kelley created conditions for legislative abolishment of unregulated child labor and better pay for not only women and children but all citizens (“Florence Kelley,” 2003). This was one of the main achievements that Florence Kelley had accomplished that is still in use today. Florence Kelley’s many preparations led to her achieving better work hours, wages, and conditions for women and children. Through her research, Florence Kelley published leaflets and persuaded many states to pass laws restricting the number of hours women worked (Baughman, 1998). Without the influence of Florence Kelley, many women today would still have bad paying jobs with terrible working conditions and long work hours/days.…

    • 998 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They were given the ability to work, get a better education, and financial aid was available for them. Eleanor Roosevelt believed in programs like this because she knew that the future of the United States depended on the children. If they did not receive the devices they needed to succeed at a young age, then the United States would not prosper. During the time of the New Deal, women benefitted from from the Fair Labor Relations Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act. These acts made it legal for women to join unions.…

    • 1157 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Analysis: The Lost Cause

    • 1131 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The UDC and the women 's fight for relevancy and more influential roles in society was the biggest reason for the group’s success. The UDC and the “Lost Cause” had a symbiotic…

    • 1131 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This rise of protests and demands was also known as the women’s suffrage movement. Many factors contributed to the rise of the women’s suffrage movement. Once women started joining the workforce, they suddenly saw their rights to provide economically for a family taken away and shamed. In society 's eyes, women were meant to stay home, cook, clean, and take care of the children. This domestic role was not favored by women.…

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Education helps to notice the differences in women from their appearance to mental development. It aims at transforming a woman into a good daughter, wife, and mother, thereby allowing them to fulfill their roles effectively. Education is also responsible for protecting women from abuse and oppression. Therefore, most of the nations have been taking special measures for encouraging women education as educated women bring a great difference to their society as well as the nation in several ways. However, there are several countries across the globe, which deny women from education due to societal…

    • 1787 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Women of the family were illuminating their voices more throughout society, changing societies perspective on themselves and the world around them. In the article Industrial Revolution and Individualism, it mentions that “Industrialism helped encourage providing economic rights to married women” (Chamberlain, 2018, p.1). Yet, not only economically were married women evolving, but many middle classed women organized social reforms for prohibition, women’s suffrage, and public health (“Progressive Era”, n.d.). Women primarily strived for political and voting rights. Women quickly realized postcards are a strong influencer to get attention with the goal of voting rights.…

    • 842 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Progressive Movement Dbq

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The increasing influence of the Progressive party at the turn of the century initiated the improvements. Progressives desired to eliminate issues caused by corruption in government, big businesses, and called for reforms in society such as women's suffrage. They agreed with the ideas of people such as Jane Addams, who in her paper, “Why Women Should Vote”, stated that if given the right to vote, women could help improve society. (Doc C). Jane Addams was a prominent women’s rights activist who help found the settlement house movement and published works such as, “Why Women Should Vote”, dedicated to improving the lives of women and the poor.…

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the early days women were seen as wives who were intended to cook, clean, and take care of the kids. They were not allowed to vote while men took care of having jobs and paying any bills that had to be paid. Soon enough it caught on that women should have a bigger role than what other people thought women should have. Women would have strikes and go on marches to prove that they should have rights just like everyone else. They faced discrimination like and other race that faced it.…

    • 776 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women were actually given a chance to show everybody that they can do things. It also showed society that women can work just as hard, if not harder, than men. All of this set the way to bigger and greater things that are society is capable of…

    • 845 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays