What Is The Role Of Colonialism In Things Fall Apart

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The novel, of Things Fall Apart written in English by a Nigerian author named Chinua Achebe. This story is about how the clan is to be overcome by the new era of the Christianity, how the Clan is doomed to suffer from the white man’s arrival. With the setting taking place in Umuofia in the late 1890’s, Okonkwo who is the main character and also the protagonist. The novel depicts life of Okonkwo, a leader and local wrestling champion in Umuofia. Specifically around this time period agriculture,culture, and tradition and was an important role in Africa on survival. In some ways people living there life in the village of Umuofia was very unique but also different in numerous ways, with certain jobs that they would have to be met.
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The Umuofia was denied by the European colonialism because, before the arrival to the village the tribe always believed in more than one god that they worshiped heavily too. When the Europeans arrived they built churches, they also changed the lifestyle of the villagers. They changed the mindset of the villagers of their beliefs “Villagers convert over to Christianity, as Okonkwo 's son Nwoye did” (Page 143). The missionaries’ message is that “there is only one true God and that the people of Mbanta are worshiping false gods. Those who worship the true god get eternal life in his happy kingdom” (Page 145). The white man also tempted the Igbo people to their side by offering them iron horses, which were in reality bicycles (Chapter 16). One of their first victims is Okonkwo’s family. The faith the plagued the community dived father from son. Nwoye bitterness towards Okonkwo, the constant beating and nagging is what caused him to change his name, and his religion to the Christian society. When Obierika asked Nwoye about his father he replied to him “that he has no father” (page 144). The Christians plan was to seek to attack the very heart of the culture beliefs. The first converts in Things Fall Apart are the people who stand to profit from change in the community. They are the people with no title in the tribe, they are those who have nothing to lose. Having the Christians bring money and jobs to the community was new to the

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