What Is The Romantic Idealism In The Great Gatsby

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We all remember our first “true love” whether it was a person in school or someone on a poster in your room. You were convinced that you would one day marry that person and you would do absolutely anything for him. However, you were oblivious to the fact that a person might not feel the same way and that ended up hurting you even more in the end. In F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, a story of love, hatred, lies and scandal is seen through the eyes of Nick Carraway. Jay Gatsby changed his life around and lived a wild, expensive one while blindly chasing after his true love that he believed were destined to be together so he could achieve his desire of becoming old money. However, he was wrong and his false beliefs and blind actions …show more content…
While he was growing up poor, he knew that he couldn’t do whatever he wanted because there were limits of his class. Now that he was successful and considered “new money”, the term used when someone made themselves wealthy as compared to the term “old money” when the wealth ran in the family, Gatsby had the money to do anything he desired. Therefore, the innocence of not being exposed to wealth when he was younger incorporates itself into the romantic idealism that he has during the story that he can buy the person he loves anything she desired. Scott F Fitzgerald portrays in Jay Gatsby the kind of materialistic man that believes anything is possible, “He presents it in Gatsby as a romantic baptism of desire for a reality that stubbornly remains out of his sight” (Bewley 2). Since he has a substantial amount of money, Gatsby now believes that he can win over anyone he wants with it, such as Daisy, and he masks up his emotions and feelings with the wealth. Basically, Bewley is saying that his innocence and blindness in love creates for him a desire for a new reality with Daisy that he tries to reach using his wealth, but still unfortunately remains out of his grasp. This false reality and innocence to the fact that he’s going after the wrong person will send him through perils of emotion, eventually killing …show more content…
Despite their high rank in society, the Buchanan’s relationship isn’t as pretty as it seems. Gatsby sees this as an advantage to steal Daisy’s heart, however his innocence and idealism blocks him from seeing the harsh reality that since they have seen each other before Gatsby went into the armed forces and before he changed his life around, Daisy’s personality has changed a lot because of Tom. Ever since she married Tom, “Her face was sad and lovely with bright things in it, bright eyes and a bright passionate mouth” (Fitzgerald 9). Fitzgerald obviously wanted to convey to the readers that Daisy has had struggles throughout her life, including marrying Tom, but she still has hope for the future. The same false hope that Gatsby has, the same hope that in fact gets Gatsby murdered. Daisy’s personality was very quiet but exciting and seductive, her presence reminds everyone around her “That she had done gay and exciting things just a while since” (Fitzgerald 9). That almost child-like glow is what drew Jay Gatsby back in again and gives him false hope that she just might fall for him again as well. She does, but before they can do anything about it, it’s too late and Gatsby was killed because of his innocence and

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