What Is The Role Of Leadership In The Tragedy Of Julius Caesar

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Antony to Rule the Republic In William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, leadership and the implications surrounding it are recurring themes. Shakespeare’s insights into the human condition create the political setting and mood of the play, which centers on a group of men in various leadership positions. This focus on realistic human condition depicts flawed characters. Their flaws then are unavoidable due to the flawed nature of the world. With all these faults in character, the question remains: who, if anyone, is best fit to lead? Marc Antony may seem like the less obvious choice, but his charisma, experience, and oratory skills equate him to Ronald Reagan and John F. Kennedy. His military experience and the respect gained from …show more content…
In order to maintain credibility and respect with the public, a leader must be able to arouse strong emotions by defining a vision which captivates and unites them. Marc Antony’s oratory ability helps him win over the people of Rome and gain credibility to unite them against a common enemy: the conspiracy. He knows the power of persuasion and shows this power in his speech at the funeral of Caesar. With only a short speech, Antony manages to completely shift the public opinion in his favor by convincing the Roman citizens to oppose the conspirators and condemn their murder of Caesar. “There 's not a nobler man in Rome than Antony,” one citizen says of Antony (Act III, Scene 2, line 115). Another citizen says of the conspirators, “O traitors, villains!” (Act III, Scene 2, line 196). By using his powers of persuasion in appealing to the preponderant emotionally susceptible American bourgeoisie, Antony would be gaining an overwhelming portion of the …show more content…
Other presidential candidates, and presidents, throughout the course of United States history had faults. Thomas Jefferson, who wrote that all men are created equal, had slaves and is rumoured to have had children with his slaves. Regardless, Thomas Jefferson was unhindered by these faults and effectively doubled the size of the United States. Antony is greedy. However, his greed only presented itself because Rome was in danger; Brutus and Cassius’ army was amassing great numbers. Antony needed to take money from the citizens, left to them by Caesar in his will, to fund an army that provided defense for Rome. He was protecting Rome’s best interests by keeping Caesar’s murderers out of Rome. Antony may have been seen as greedy for a position of power as well; he later did not want to give the control of Rome to Octavius. Antony was reluctant to give up the throne to an inexperienced seventeen-year-old. Antony was far more experienced than Octavius, and was far more equipped to lead than

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