What Is The Relationship Between Music And Music

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After the release of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. As one views statistics about participation in organized religion that I have brought to light, so as to show that religion had become an important part of early twentieth century American culture, one might believe that this participation is the only way to gauge America’s feelings towards religion. If this were the case, then post-Pepper’s America had not changed at all. In American Religion, Chavez references a study done through the years 1978-2008, that describes the percentages of Americans who regularly attend religious services on a weekly basis. From this data, He asserts, “Reasonable people can disagree about whether the big story here is that attendance has gone down or …show more content…
Robin Sylvan discusses this relationship in depth. He begins his discussion of religion and music by describing the “levels” through which these two concepts are connected: physiological, psychological, sociocultural, semiological, virtual, ritual, and spiritual. All of these aspects are very important to this relationship, but I will focus especially the sociocultural level of music. He argues that music and culture are two inseparable aspects of human life, because music expresses common values within these cultures. He also claims that music is different from culture to culture, because of these different cultural values.This is why certain features within music such as instrumentation, harmonies, and rhythms will evoke certain emotions to a person of a certain culture, while people from different cultural backgrounds will not feel the same emotions from the same music (Sylvan 27-29). He goes on to describe Rock ‘n’ Roll music and its genesis and its effect on society in the 60s.There is a direct line from Traditional West African music to Rock ‘n’ Roll music. The music developed by the local cultures directly dealt with their religious beliefs. This music was transferred from their original West African home to The United States of America because of the large slave trade that happened between these two areas during the eighteenth century. This music then slowly transformed itself into what we know as Blues. …show more content…
Recording has allowed for artists to no longer be held down by their previous chains that is the live performance. Their music could be archived on a physical medium, and it contained all of the nuances that made the music unique to them (Frith 269-270). Frith asserts “This affected not just what sort of music people listened to (and listened to more and more after the First World War) but also how they listened to it, how they registered the emotional meaning of sounds, one the one hand, the musical shape of their own emotions, one the other,” (Frith 269). What Frith is stating is that, first, recording change the types of music and how frequently they listened to said music, and, second, changed how they interpreted the emotions of the music and their own

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