What Is The Reasons To Be Against The Death Penalty

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The death penalty is a controversial and heated topic. While some have strong reasons to be in support of it, others have strong reasons to be against it. The reading by Nathanson, the news article I have selected, and the movie Last Dance either implicitly or explicitly give reasons to be against the death penalty. Berns presents an argument in support of the death penalty. I will analyze these sources and consider the multiple perspectives in a critical manner. I will begin by analyzing Berns’ argument. He starts by describing examples of crimes that people have a right to be justifiably angry about, such as someone being murdered (Berns 312). He uses an example of a mob of people wanting justice and argues that the law should provide such …show more content…
While some think the death penalty says something positive about society, that members take the law seriously, others argue that it says something negative, that it shows a disregard for human life. Beyond just what it reflects about society, it is important to see how this punishment will be consequential on the victim and the victim’s family and the criminal’s family. Some may see it as justice or as a way to seek revenge while others may be more distraught as someone’s life is being taken. Because of the complex and unique reactions that those directly and indirectly involved with an execution can have, when the decision is made to put someone to death, it must not be made lightly, if it is made at all. Outside variables can get in the way of making the proper decision. When emotions are used to make this decision instead of objectivity, the wrong choice may be made that could leave one with future …show more content…
He first says that it shows that human beings have value, regardless of the actions that they take in their lives (319). This is referring to the idea that each person, as a human being, has a minimal innate worth that cannot be taken away as a result of how one acts or by how one is treated by others. If this is true, it calls into question directly whether the death penalty is moral and should be used to punish human beings for their actions. Furthermore, Nathanson describes how abolishing the death penalty will teach society that each life is precious and that violence should be minimally used (322). One’s perspective will determine one’s response, something that Nathanson does not take into account. Some may see the symbolism in the way that Nathanson describes. While he may argue that he is respecting human lives by abolishing the death penalty, others may argue that he is not respecting the victim of the crime who had his or her life taken or experienced something traumatically

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