The Problem With Illegal Immigrants

2318 Words 9 Pages
Welcome or Get Rid of: The Problem with Illegal Immigrants To become a citizen, an immigrant must be a legal resident and have a “Green card” for at least five years before filing for naturalization. If there are no “exceptions” such as having a parent who is a citizen, an immigrant must get a labor certification. Naturalization is “voluntarily becoming a U.S. citizen” (“How to Become a U.S. Citizen” 1). Additionally, an immigrant must have residency in a single state for three months and have a clean disciplinary record. They must be able to write, read, and speak English and know background U.S. government history. According to Paul McDaniel, the application for naturalization for an adult costs $680 and can prohibit many legal permanent …show more content…
There are 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States (Hunt 1). This number has decreased in the past few years, but ultimately has been very high. Regardless of how much money America spends on securing the borders or building “the wall” between Mexico and America, this number probably won’t falter much. Much like in the past with the Berlin Wall, a wall would not have 100 percent security and would cost unnecessary money. There was a bill back in 2013 that would remedy many problems of immigration. It was the bipartisan immigration bill that would give a “pathway to citizenship” for undocumented people. It also called for $46 billion additional to regulate the borders with more agents (2). Although they would not have to work on deporting all of the families in America, they could work towards a more regulated border. It would help regulate illegal immigrants while helping the ones in America whom work here. This bill would also look good for many other reasons. It would show that America is a welcoming place for immigrant workers. America would be working to be inclusive without letting down their defense. They would strengthen their defense while giving people an easier obtainable path to …show more content…
This belief stems from the idea that an American educated native could be easily overlooked by an employer for an immigrant. Places with higher immigration, if this were a true fact, would show more unemployment in hard times (“The Economic Blame Game” 1). This simply is not evident in the United States. Many immigrants and American-born people do not even compete for the same types of jobs. This could be due to language or education barriers, but immigrant jobs usually compliment native-born jobs rather than take them (1). Illegal immigrants go for jobs that will not get them caught in the system. Many of these include sewing or maintenance work for very little income. Legal immigrants go for construction labor, taxi drivers, and maid jobs (Camarota and Zeigler 1). These are jobs that many Americans, even in need of work, would not wish to do. If anything, increased immigration provides more jobs in the economy. When they earn money, they spend money and in turn, stimulate the economy. They are also 30 percent more likely to start their own businesses in America than native-born people (1). This is not the fault of the immigrants. They are not taking that opportunity away from Americans. Native-born people are just as qualified to start a business for themselves but more immigrants are likely to act on this goal than native-born people. America just wants a scapegoat for the joblessness

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