What Is The Meaning Of The Poem To A Mouse

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There are some in this world who are considered outcasts, the wallflowers of society, to whom we neglect, vilify and abuse. And just as the poor mouse portrayed in the poem ‘To a Mouse,’ written by Robert Burns, was bothered by the outside world, the character Lennie, from the book ‘Of Mice and Men,” was also regarded with similar contempt and scorn, from those of society. In the poem ‘To a Mouse,’ the mouse represents Lennie from the book “Of Mice and Men.” As was the narrator, or speaker in the poem, representing George, as well as the men spoken about in the poem, were almost in direct reference to the men depicted in “Of Mice and Men.” The poem also depicts and illustrates some paramount, crucial turning points in the book. In addition …show more content…
In turn, relating to the significance in the allusion of the book. Additionally, in the poem, the mouse represents Lennie, as does the narrator in the poem represent George, as were the men referenced in the poem, a representation of the men on the ranch, from the novel “Of Mice and Men.” A quote from the poem to showcase this would be, “I'm truly sorry man's dominion, has broken Nature's social union, and justifies that ill opinion which makes thee startle at me, thy poor, earth born companion. And fellow mortal!” As well as the verse, “I doubt not, sometimes, but you may steal; What then? Poor little beast, you must live!” These quoted verses are acknowledging and giving an apology, to the mouse, or in the case of the book, Lennie. Apologizing for how man and society are so cruel, broken and lacking in humanity, towards those such as he. As man only holds prejudice, ostracizes and holds very poor opinion of those like Lennie and the poor little mouse spoken about in the poem itself. In addition to this, one could infer the meaning of these verses to translate to the message, …show more content…
Robert Burns masterfully displays this through the verse, “The best laid schemes of mice and men, go often awry.” This verse explains that even the most thoughtful, mindful planning that goes into turning dreams and desires into realities, often is tampered with, by the hands change. Steinbeck embraces this theme by writing each of his characters with a sense of longing, and desire for something, for each of his characters had a desire they wanted to satiate, or a dream they wanted to make a reality. For instance, Curley desperately wanted his wife to love and be loyal to him. Where the wife wanted to be free and independent, not chained to Curley's side, nor the title of being his

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