What Is The Meaning Of Human Nature In Lord Of The Flies

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In William Golding’s novel, Lord of the Flies, human nature is placed conspicuously in view as a group of British boys find themselves stranded alone on an island without any adults to supervise or lead them. The conflict between the human as a civilized entity and the human as an unsophisticated animal are represented by two of the main characters in the novel, Ralph and Jack, respectively. Being in their youth and thus not totally biased towards the workings of a civilized, adult world, Golding portrays what he believes is the typical human’s natural state; cruel, selfish, and wanting of instant gratification. It becomes a wonder then, how society operates and is seen as civilized. Golden attacks this notion and demonstrates that society’s …show more content…
Introduced early in the novel is a fictitious “beastie” that eventually holds the entire group of survivors in fear and trepidation of being killed. Of course, the survivors do not realize that this beastie does not exist; at least not as a physical entity. It is rather their false perspective of its existence that ensues chaos and disorder on the island. In a fantastical display of dramatic irony, the reader witnesses that as fear encroaches the minds of the boys, they become violent and obsessed with this beast. Fear eventually leads to many succumbing to Jack as leader of the group, because he is confident that they will be capable of killing the beast. Latent inside of them, reckless degeneracy takes hold and many of the boys form a sort of cult with Jack as their leader. While the reader sees them clearly as having become decadent, it is not at all obvious to themselves. It is metaphorically a https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-fulfilling_prophecy self-fulfilling prophecy; while the beast did not originally exist, it eventually takes form. It is not a tangible form as the boys assume, but instead one found in the heart of everyone; they themselves are the …show more content…
As the story progresses, we see that this line thins out and eventually obfuscates what we believe is civilized and what isn’t. At the start of the novel, many of the children find themselves to be in Paradise; there is no supervision and they are free to play whatever games they wish. The utopia that they believe themselves to be in belies the dystopia that they soon create. As Jack becomes absorbed in killing a pig, his bloodlust becomes the contagion that adulterates the purity of the supposedly innocent young boys on the island. They slowly lose themselves from the inauspicious situation they are in. Jack and his choir fail to create a signal fire, their only hope of escape and a symbol for a desire to return home, and eventually forego the idea. In fact, the fire that eventually attracts a soldier to rescue them is not a signal fire at all, but one meant to kill Ralph. It is not through an organized, civilized effort that they are noticed, but a desultory process that signifies the beasts they have become. The fire is a symbol of hope, and as a return to civilized society. But at the same time, it is also a symbol of destruction that encapsulates the group of stranded boys. While a controlled fire provides warmth and safety, it easily becomes hectic and a foil for the violent state of humanity. While society attempts to curb this fire, it

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