Comparing Jesus And Paul's Letter To The Mosaic Law

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In the book of Matthew, Jesus explains what is means to follow him in full obedience to God and Paul teaches people how to live out that obedience in his letter to the Romans. These two passages present the same viewpoint despite the different elements of humanity each depicts. Both Jesus and Paul present that Jesus is the way, the truth, and the light for eternal life. However, obedience to the Mosaic Law is the affirmation of that faith. Matthew chapter five tells us that in the early stages of his ministry, Jesus prepared for a Sermon on the Mount. His disciples traveled alongside him as he healed and preached and healed more and more. People would flock to him, out of both curiosity and loyalty, as news of his healing spread. As amazing as that was, physical healing was not the only reason Jesus came. He knew people needed a cure from sin that reached deep into their soul and that kind of freedom began with him. And so he climbed to Mount Sinai and preached …show more content…
Paul believed that justification of sin could be obtained through faith in Jesus, and not through observation of the Mosaic law because Jesus Christ is the Savior of all humanity. For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus (Rom. 3:23-24). Before Jesus it was almost impossible to sacrifice enough to God in pay for a sin because everyone sins and is born with sin. The Mosaic Law was created to reduce that sin through rules but Jesus overrode those rules and created a relationship with God through him. No one will be declared righteous in his sight by observing the law (Rom. 3:20). Paul tells the people that they will never be worthy of righteousness through their works because there will always be sin. Through faith in Jesus everyone can be forgiven for all sins committed past, present, and

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