What Is The Importance Of Education In The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass

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The past weeks we have read a book named Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. The book is about a former slave named Frederick Douglass, who was born into slavery which he didn’t fully understand until a later stage of his life. The book addresses his life as a slave and how he came to understand the meaning of slavery in a segregated world where white supremacy existed. In the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, the author Douglass mentions the importance of education and how it helped him to freedom but at the same time how painful it was to learn the truth of how Africans ended up as slaves in the first place. In the book, Mr. Douglass challenges many of the beliefs of the slaveholders and the purpose of education, and how …show more content…
In the first two chapters of the book Douglass introduces himself to the readers. Douglass tells the readers that he doesn’t have any knowledge about his age and he has never, in fact, met another slave who could tell his age (41). This quote shows how the slave 's owners managed to dehumanize their slaves by keeping something as simple as their age from them. Knowing your own age is a right every human being has. By taking away that privilege from the slaves they have successfully dehumanized them. Another example of how the slave owners dehumanized their slaves was by separating the children from their parents. Douglass didn’t grow up with his mother but instead he grew up with an elder women that was outside the plantation; this elder woman was in charge of raising all the newborn slave children, “I had always lived with my grandmother on the outskirts of the plantation, where she was put to raise the children of the younger women”(46). As a consequence, Douglass never really knew his real mother more than few visits she did while she was still alive. “I never saw my mother, to know her as such, more than four or five times in my life” (Douglass 42). As a result, Douglass didn’t really feel anything special towards his mother and at the age of seven Douglass mother died and his master didn’t allow him to be by her side during her illness, at her death, or even at her funeral (Douglass 43). …show more content…
After Douglass moved to Baltimore his new master, master Auld wife taught him how to read and write. Once master Auld found out what his wife was doing he yelled at his wife saying, “Learning would spoil the best nigger in the world” (63). This shows that the slave owners wanted to keep the slaves as ignorant as possible. They were afraid if the slaves got educated they would demolish the belief that slaves couldn’t learn anything and they would lose order and law in the system. Not only that but they also knew that nothing was going to keep them in chains anymore because master Auld himself said: “If you give a nigger an inch, he will take an ell” (63). I think what master Auld meant by this is if the slaves got the education and became just like the white people there would be nothing to stop the slaves from enslaving the white people because the white people in the first place used education to enslave the colored

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