What Is The Importance Of Development In Child Development

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This essay will lend evidence to the argument that children learn and develop in many different ways. I will explore implications for child development in relation to two tasks, an elicitation and a non-participant observation. To explore the potential of this, I have explored literature and relevant studies to support the analysis of my findings. I will refer to and recognise indicators in relation to current statutory frameworks of the Early Years Foundation stage, (EYFS 2014) and Development Matters. (Reference.) The aim of this paper is to improve my pedagogical knowledge on how children learn and develop, however, it is important for me to realise that as a practitioner, I am also a theorist. This is because my work as a teacher will involve …show more content…
Confidentiality and anonymity is a key ethical tension that needed to be addressed during my work. I had to ensure that the findings could not be relatable to individuals, (Christensen, 2004). I was conscious that I required to exert and clarify the implications to all the participants involved, and to always check that consent was provided under this compliant (BSA, 2002). To try and tackle this problematical dilemma, I used pseudonym names, suggested by Kelly (2009). Before gaining consent, I stated to all participants that their involvement in the research would be …show more content…
I chose a pinecone for the children to feel and describe to represent the word ‘bumpy’. Nearly all the children used ‘bumpy’ in their vocabulary whilst discussing what they could feel. However, only around 40% of the children knew what a pinecone was, and this was due to prior experiences. When questioned further about how they knew this they responded ‘I know because I live near a woods’ or ‘ we go for walks at Leigh woods at the weekend’. The children knew this because of their socio-cultural background and the experiences they have been involved with. Goswami (2007) refers to this as ‘socially medicated learning’ that arises from the children’s experiences that are rooted in their social context. These knowledgeable statements from the children are a direct criticism of Piaget’s neglect to the socio-cultural context of learning. The other children in the group that could identify a pine cone responded to the other children by explaining what it was, and discussing their experiences, please see appendix x. Vygotsky social constructivism theory can be referred to here, as according to Mercer and Littleton (2007.p.13) ‘peer interaction is most effective when a more competent child provides on who is less so with the kind of help that suits their ZPD’. As a practitioner I believe there should be more emphasis placed on the importance

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