Oil 4 Blood Analysis

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What started with settler colonialism resulted in the multiple trials and horrors the Indigenous Americans had to go through. From gendercide, resource extraction, racism and much more both Frank Waln and Deborah Miranda shed light on the effects of colonialism. What’s more they bring the message to resist the government’s current attempts of erasure, reclaiming the identity of their ancestors, and righting the wrong done to the “Red Nation” in the past. Before looking into the conversation between the two, bringing up their background helps gets an idea of their perspective. The Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota was one of the poorest counties in the country, so Waln saw firsthand by living there, the injustice still today for the …show more content…
In his music video “Oil 4 Blood”, he takes on the Keystone XL pipeline. Waln calls on the Red Nation to rise and stand against the unlawful resource extraction taking place there. Also, the pipeline further exists as a symbol of settler colonialism and the continued institutional suppression. In order to drive back the institution, there must exist an “commitment to community” between the different reservations, for they are all “red” and the fight is theirs. In Deborah Miranda’s case her literary piece went deeply into detail about the wrongs against the “Joyas”. While the attempts to exterminate the Joyas in California were from the Spanish settlers, nonetheless an foreign power came to impose their will on the indigenous …show more content…
In “Oil 4 Blood” the NDN tape over the mouth symbolizes the labels American society and the government places on them. Anything that is not the staple representation, does not fit their idea of an authentic “Indian”, and therefore not recognized as such. To Waln and many others, allowing the government to define them is unacceptable, and ignores the diversity of Native Americans. This mirrors the way European settlers tried to enforce their definition of gender role, not recognizing the Joyas as part of the culture. The American flag blinds Waln by disguising its wrongs as nationalism. In the name of “profit” for U.S., the pipeline extracts further resources and at the same time damages and poisons the environment. Miranda also addressed the European colonizers’ attempt to erase “tribal terms, tribal group names, and personal tribal names.” Erasing all this ties back into the monetary agenda, which strips the Native community of their culture/sovereignty, and leads to assimilation. After removal, the government can take the resources without worry for their opponents are assimilated or insignificant. Furthermore, the colonizers attempt to erase a part of Native American culture by killing the Joya population completely off. Gendercide is what Miranda calls it, and it is fitting with the destruction of the “third gender”. The colonizers brutal and

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