What Is The Dualist Concept Of The Soul

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Neuroscience, Psychology, and Religion has centered on the connection between religion and science, specifically focusing on the “soul.” The beginning chapters explored the historical philosophies surrounding the concept of the soul while later chapters have sought to reconcile recent discoveries in neuroscience with common theory. Within these chapters the authors presented a “physicalist” understanding of the soul, contrary to Descartes’ dualist view of the brain/soul. Though neuroscience research has not declaratively disproved the dualistic theory of brain/mind, chapter 8 explores the implications of alternative brain/soul views. Neuroscientists seem to be in agreement that the mind is an embodiment of the physical processes of the brain. …show more content…
A similar term for emergence is dynamic systems theory (Jeeves and Brown, 2009). Dynamic systems theory, applied to the brain, shows that numerous synapses and interconnections create neuronal tracts responsible for the emergence of the human mind. Thus, the mind is not a localized portion of brain matter, but rather the result of complex general processing. The most interesting property of the dynamic systems theory according to the authors is, “The systems manifest novelty. The behavior of the entire system, even given a stable environment, is not entirely predictable” (Jeeves and Brown, 2009, 115). A trickle down affect from general processing of the brain/mind affects the individual neurons that comprise it, top-down causation. As a result, the brain modifies itself to accompany for the changes occurring at higher levels, a term referred to as brain plasticity (Jeeves and Brown, …show more content…
Rather complex behaviors and emotions emerge from continual adaptations (top-down causation/ plasticity) in relation to social and cultural environment (Jeeves and Brown, 2009). However, science continues to suggest relatedness amongst animals and humans specifically in terms of base-line cognition. At what point do humans distinguish themselves from other animals? According to Alison Brooks human uniqueness is the result of progressive “social intelligence” composed of six different faculties. However, science is only beginning to scratch the surface with regards to defining

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