What Is The Absence Of Gender Equality And Human Rights?

1596 Words 6 Pages
Resuming with the way some women are treated as property in Afghanistan, Iraq, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Women have been known to be sold as if they are an object rather than a human. The women that are sold have the absence of gender equality and human rights. When the women are sold then are intended for the purpose as sex slave. From Iraq Fiona Keating reports, “At least 2,500 women and children have been imprisoned, sexually abused and sold for around $10 each by Isis slavers.” 2,500 women and children with their rights stolen from them. That is a remarkably high number that shows how much gender equality and female safety is needed in Iraq. Afghanistan is also known for some of its women being sold into slavery. Heidi Kingstone …show more content…
Education is an opportunity that isn’t equal between the genders in the countries of Afghanistan, Iraq, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The level of education defines the lives of billions of people, but the women of Afghanistan lack the conditions to go to school. Aryn Barker …show more content…
There are laws in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Democratic Republic of Congo to protect women but, they are not being enforced. Child marriage, forced marriages, selling and buying women for the purpose of marriage, giving women away to settle a dispute, along with many acts of violence are outlawed in Afghanistan and Iraq. With the laws in place many of the crimes are not reported or the cases are withdrawn or mediated (Kuehnast). Women are not receiving the same protection under the law as men. Is it not human right to have equality in safety and justice? The women’s offender are often times not punched for their crimes because cultural beliefs are that women aren’t as significant as men. The Afghanistan government has failed to help these women after eight years. “After eight years on there is still no real police force, the country is still ‘underdeveloped’ and poor, and women’s lives are beyond miserable” (Kingstone). The lives of these women are horrific and need proper protection. Lisa Cornish in the article Fighting for women’s rights in the DRC explains, “U.N. General Assembly noted that violence against women and girls in the Congo were “deep-seated cultural norms.”” In the Democratic Republic of Congo it is normal for women to be abused. Congo is rated the most dangerous place for women (Cornish). The conditions women face in the Democratic Republic of Congo are

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