Character Analysis Of Relationships In The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Relationships are an integral part of life. The need to belong and the desire to be a part of something has been prevalent for many years. We are autonomous beings with our own conscious, yet our views and decisions are influenced by those we idolize. Even after our companions leave, we take action in their memory. In the novel The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald illustrates the impact of admiring someone through the voice of narrator Nick Carraway. Nick writes a book about his friend, Jay Gatsby, and although he attempts to honour him through his romanticized account of his story, he unknowingly reveals the flaws within both their characters and ideals. Nick Carraway comes across as a seemingly friendly, hopeful man, in the pursuit of “well-roundedness.” …show more content…
Gatsby’s faults are highlighted in the way he dismisses Myrtle’s death, “I thought so; I told Daisy I thought so. It 's better that the shock should come all at once. She stood it pretty well.” (136) Gatsby’s reaction is inadequate, and Nick’s feelings shifted from “I disliked him so by this time that I didn’t find it necessary to tell him he was wrong.” (136) to “’You’d better come home and get some sleep.’” (pg.137) He fails to recognize Gatsby’s responsibility as a bystander. Later on, Nick reveals Gatsby’s full story of falling in love with Daisy. He purposely exposed James Gatz ahead of time to end on a tragically romantic note, “I think that he would have acknowledged anything now, without reserve, but he wanted to talk about Daisy.” (141) Nonetheless, we observe faults in Gatsby’s love story. “He might have despised himself, for he had certainly taken her under false pretenses… But he didn’t despise himself and it didn’t turn out as he had imagined.” (142) Nick centralizing on her wealth and their class difference. This makes Gatsby’s true desires questionable, “and of Daisy, gleaming like silver, safe and proud above the hot struggles of the poor.” (142) Gatsby also speaks in ego when he blatantly dismisses Daisy and Tom. Nick, who views the situation through …show more content…
The green light within the narrative acts as Gatsby’s lighthouse. It stands on Daisy’s dock, representing that wholesome American Dream that Gatsby is constantly striving for, “he stretched his arms towards the dark water in a curious way.” And, “Involuntarily I glanced seaward- and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away,” (25) No matter how far it truly is, Gatsby continuously chases it as it represents, “the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us.” (171) Yet this green light remained just a symbol throughout the book, an unattainable dream of wealth and perfection that remained across the vast bay. The symbol that comes alive is the “blue and gigantic” eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleberg, who “broods over the solemn dumping ground.” (76) He watches over the Valley of Ashes, staring at the wealthy from the wreck that they leave behind in their wake. The owl eyes of T.J. Eckleberg eventually comes to life as a visitor that ascertained that was the only other man, excluding Nick and Gatsby’s father, to attend Gatsby’s funeral. This symbol came to life to ascertain the fact that there would always be a watcher, always be someone who saw through it all. Perhaps the most tragic yet integral scenes in showing the empty legacy left behind by Gatsby are those of his funeral. Nick uses the scramble of getting people to attend his

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