Jamrozik And Relativism

771 Words 4 Pages
Jamrozik (2005) on the other hand explores capitalism with reference to unemployment. He explores the way in which individuals who are unemployed are ostracized and blamed for their own situation whilst the fact is that most unemployment is structural and an effect of how the capitalist system of production decides who and how people can be employed (Jamrozik, 2005, p. 318). The Howard government’s idea of the two theories ‘mutual obligation’ and ‘work for the dole’ has been perpetuated by both Labor and Liberal governments since its commencement. One can see that the approach is a consequence of the State’s acceptance of neo-liberal and economic rationalist perceptions which have eroded citizenship and social rights for welfare (Jamrozik, …show more content…
However, due to the close connections between the state and business this is an illusion (Kuhn, 2005, p. 40). Therefore this indicates that the State turns out to be a hindrance in contrast to which civil society must struggle for the power to make social change. Above all the government is only a part of the State. It is alleged that bureaucrats and judges are also alert to the benefits of the capitalist class (Kuhn, 2005, p. 40). The difference between theory and reality is exploited by power. In theory all people have the same legal status and their rights are equal; this should mean that everyone behaves according to the rules. However this is not the case. In reality the State survives off the enforcement of property rights because the majority of the property is retained and organized by capitalists. The State uses the police force and the military to secure the wellbeing of the ruling class. Police and the military are used as second-hand organisation to exploit power as they ‘smash picket lines, break up demonstrations, bully and intimidate individuals, reinforce racism and create panics about law and order’ (Kuhn, 2005, p. 40). This is where their source of their power is …show more content…
The capitalist class have an unequal influence making them the more dominant individuals of society. In comparison of civil society or the ordinary individual, the capitalist class contains more power because of the productive resources and hierarchies they control (Kuhn, 2005, p. 46). Politician’s democratic views and job security have a tendency to be determined by economic growth. To ensure that economic growth continues politicians have a habit of putting forward policies and strategies that accomplishes and triumphs this ideology, because as a result this benefit capitalists. The State also has the authority to set rules, regulation and develop laws that have an impact on civil society’s foundations such as the family. The education system that has been developed by the government trains people to fulfil the roles that businesses demand, to follow rules and to accept the existing state of affairs. Privatization of public assets and the ‘outsourcing’ of services has created a ‘user pays’ system which benefits business, and creates inequality within society (Kuhn, 2005, p.

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