Moral Psychology

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Implementing thought experiments in Cognitive Science implicates imagining a situation and analyzing the outcome. These experiments assist in evaluating the study of moral psychology. Peoples’ emotions can be uncontrollable when reacting to a particular situation regarding morality. These specific situations give us space to analyze into the mentality or moral appraising. How these moral appraisal “reaction occurs”, will be further looked upon throughout this essay.
Moral situation is a conflict that ensues in people’s lives when they have to decide between two or more engagements that are perceived as right or wrong. One example that will be further examined is the notion of moral situations and how is occurs. One concept we will focus on
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Since the participants would only be killing one person as a replacement for of five, some perceived this as the notion of utilitarianism “the greater good for the greatest number,” in this case saving five people instead of focusing on the individual. While, other participants stated that having any involvement, would connect them to someone’s death and therefore, “getting their hands dirty.” Regardless to how the decisions where rationalized, both resulted in death of one or multiple people. This leaves the participants with the encounter of internal moral conflict; using utilitarianism to rationalize whether one death while saving five is moral, or allowing a group of five people to die, to not have an impact on the individuals life is moral. When answering this moral dilemma, there was much conflict in how people felt it should be dealt with (Shenhav &Greene, 2012 and Kamm, 2015).
Stanovich imposes that moral appraisal involves two systems: the TASS and the analytical system (Stanovich, 2004). These two systems are part of the dual process theory, where there are two separate cognitive systems within the brain for cognitive decision making and implementing. The TASS is an evolutionary, quick and automatic based processing system found within people. Whereas the analytical system is an advanced higher order but lengthy and explicitly controlled cognitive processing system. (Stanovich,

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