What Is John's Relationship In The Yellow Wallpaper

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A healthy relationship is built upon trust, loyalty, and support. A successful relationship is one where both parties view each other as equals and share responsibilities. “The Yellow Wallpaper” depicts the narrator's unhealthy dependency on John, who is in charge of her mental health and physical state. Apart from being her doctor, she believes they are married. Charlotte Perkins Gilman demonstrates how ignoring one’s concerns in a relationship results in distrust and destruction through the relationship between John and the narrator in “The Yellow Wallpaper”.
John's position of power creates a strain within their relationship because as her doctor, his professional and personal lives are overlapping; his treatment towards her is therefore affected. “He is very careful and loving, and hardly lets me stir without special direction” (Gilman 5). Careful and loving are two words one would typically associate with a significant other but when the narrator mentions she is not to be left alone ‘without special direction’, it paints an image suggesting John doesn't trust her enough to be independent.
Support and understanding are integral in a healthy relationship and these are two key points John and the narrator lack. “It’s so discouraging not to have any advice and companionship about
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“The fact is I am getting a little afraid of John” (Gilman 13). This is the pivotal turning point for the narrator when she begins to realize John does not and never has taken her seriously. As mentioned previously, she believed socializing would do her well but isolation led to her deteriorating self of mind. She becomes reclusive and presents herself as well-mannered in John’s presence to prevent any issues from arising. “John is so queer now, that I don’t want to irritate him” (Gilman 16). She no longer trusts him and instead fears him, opting to hide her true

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