What Is Jean Piaget Theory And Equilibration?

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Biologist and psychologist Jean Piaget was born on August 9, 1896, in Switzerland. He was his parents’ first child. Piaget’s mother, Rebecca Jackson, attributed his intense early interest in the sciences to his own neurotic tendencies. Piaget’s father, named Arthur, was a medieval literature professor and was a passionate about his studies, which Jean Piaget began to emulate from an early age. Throughout his childhood, Piaget was fascinated with the local museum of natural history, where he would examine specimens for hours. He then went on to write brief scientific papers about the animals he saw. By the time he was a teenager, his works were published and viewed as expert findings and research. After high school, Piaget attended the University …show more content…
Also known as a continuous process, equilibration is an underlying theme of all development. Many psychologists believed that development results in part from conflicts between opposing forces and how it is resolved. Through the course of equilibration, individuals pursue a state of balance amongst their psychological structure and how well those structures meet their mutable needs. Piaget believed that equilibration was the primary driving force behind development. Jean Piaget used equilibration to define the cognitive development of children. He also addressed how children acquire new information about their world. The shift the children take from one stage of thought to another is completed by a search for equilibration, or an inner sense of balance between old and new thoughts. As children interact with the world, they are bounded by countless objects to discover and ideas to contemplate. Living day by day, children are confronted with the opportunities to develop their own knowledge. (Mazarin, …show more content…
In more simple terms Piaget called the schema the basic building block of intelligent behavior and a way of establishing knowledge. When Piaget spoke about the development of a person 's mental processes, he was referring to increases in the number and complexity of the schemata that a person had learned. The assumption of this concept is that one stores these mental representations and apply them when he or she needs them. For example, a person might have a schema about purchasing a meal in a restaurant. The schema is a stored form of the pattern of behavior which includes: looking at a menu, ordering food, eating it and paying the bill. Whenever he or she is in a restaurant, he or she retrieves this schema from memory and applies it to the situation. (McLeod,

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