The Importance Of Interspecific Competition

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Interspecific competition is the competition between two different species. Interspecific competition results from many species with similar niches and limited resources available. A niche is defined as an area that a species inhabits, the role or function of the species in the ecosystem and the species relationship with all is biotic and abiotic factors affecting it (Biology online dictionary, 2015).The limiting resources could be resources such as mates’ nutrients and space (M. Beals, L. Gross, S. Harrell, 1999).
Competition exists between species with similar niches and limited resources because they are dependent on the same substances and environment to insure their survival and thus they compete. Competition will result in the better
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& Falcon-Lang, 2010). Interspecific competition can result in competitive co-existence or competitive exclusion (solutions for all life science, grade 11 textbook, 2014). Competitive co-existence allows two species of similar niches to co-exist due to resource partitioning. Resource partitioning allows two species to share common resources so that one does not outcompete the other. (Benton, and Ferry, 2010). However competitive exclusion is when two species which compete for the same resources cannot co-exist. For the fact that one species will always have a slight advantage over its competing species, resulting in the extinction of the ‘weaker’ species (Science daily, …show more content…
K. French investigated the effect of increased nutrient availability on competition amongst invasive and native plants. He did so by measuring changes in above and below ground biomass of Chrysanthemoides monilifera spp. rotundata (bitou bush) and Asparagus aethiopicus (asparagus fern) competing with two native species, Banksia integrifolia and Ficinia nodosa, under high and low nutrient conditions. As a result Bito bush was a primary invader, it was the better competitor under both conditions. The Asparagus was the secondary invader who only reacted when exposed to high nutrients level and both native species were negatively affected. This research is valid for it was conducted by a biologist from the University of Wollongong from the School of Biological sciences department. (K. French,

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