What Is Immigration To Me Essay

1632 Words 7 Pages
I am an immigrant, which sometimes I view as a privilege and other times not so much. It felt wonderful when my relatives were kind to my family when we got our visas to come to the United States. I was born in Bangladesh in a small village in my tiny house. Not the typical story you hear from many of my peers. My birth is very important to me, not because I ever celebrated it. It wasn’t even until I came to the United States that I realized that people actually celebrate their birthdays, but I never argued with my parents about celebrating because I knew my parents couldn’t afford it. A small cake might not seem like much, but when you are poor in a developing country needs are usually never met, and a cake is a want. I was a somewhat …show more content…
on June 26, 2006. My life didn’t differ that much from Bangladesh, especially the way we lived. Well, maybe I mean now I eat chicken almost every day. In Bangladesh, chicken was commonly served only on special holidays or for guests. In Bangladesh we lived in a two bedroom house, as we do now, except now we have to pay rent, which takes away all my father’s earnings. In Bangladesh, I’d probably be hearing marriage proposals by now. As I said before, (you never really said that – find another way to say “In Bangladesh – don’t use Bangladesh again though.) my mother is culturally conservative and my father is more of a liberal. He wants all his children to graduate from college and be set for a career. My mother on the other hand sometimes mentions marriage and life as a …show more content…
Pew Research shows that only a small number of minority students actually see a trend in economic upsurge even with a Bachelor’s degree. Not because they are not intellectually incompetent, but because of their limited opportunities. Many minorities are usually first generation college students and the whole family or even the community has high expectations of them. When they fall short of that expectation, they view themselves as failures; thus unable to cope properly. Furthermore, economically disadvantaged students cannot always come back to school for further education, unlike their wealthier counterparts. Pursuing to become a pediatrician, I have to attend medical school. Many students that apply to medical school finish their undergraduate course with gap years to prepare for MCAT, but I cannot do that because I won’t be able to afford another year at

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